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Food Variety
Tue 28-Jun-11
10:13 pm
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Shereen
Near Belfast, Northen Ireland

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G sent me this article from National Geographic because it reminded him of one of the many rants I've ranted at him over the years.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/07/food-ark.....ty-graphic

Look at the top of the graph, and then at the same vegetable at the bottom of the graph. Some of the reductions are really quite remarkable. I've ranted the rant about the reduction in the range of apples, pears and strawberries we can get these days; but I'd never stopped to consider the wider implications of the decrease for our fruit and veg intake.

And, to add insult to injury both plant stalls at the market were only selling Elsanta strawberry plants this Spring because so many people had been asking for them. doh

Wed 29-Jun-11
9:47 am
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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See here for information on the Heritage Seed Library which campaigns on this in the UK. And they supply seed to a company that grows the plants--I can't remember which company, but they produce plug plants, I will try to remember where I saw this and look it up--because you can't see the seed but you can sell plants grown from the seed. doh

Wed 29-Jun-11
9:53 am
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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And there are great reductions in the vitamin and mineral content of commercially grown vegetables over the last 60 years. The studies that form the basis of textbook lists of the values of foods were done before widespread use of fertilizers and pesticides, and studies done recently suggest that the values have fallen, or plummetted in some cases. A few studies show that veg grown organically have higher vit. and min. content than conventionally grown ones. I know there has been a study on lettuce, and there are others.

Presumably using compost and feeding the soil feeds the plants better than fertilizer does.

Wed 29-Jun-11
9:58 am
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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It's the same with bananas, in the whole world, only one variety is sold commercially, so if there were to be a disease that wiped out that variety, we'd have no commercial back-up.  There are other varieties but they are not grown in great enough quantity to replace the other.

I'll try that again!

Wed 29-Jun-11
10:04 am
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Hattie
Bucks/Oxon Border

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devongarden said:

See here for information on the Heritage Seed Library which campaigns on this in the UK. And they supply seed to a company that grows the plants--I can't remember which company, but they produce plug plants, I will try to remember where I saw this and look it up--because you can't see the seed but you can sell plants grown from the seed. doh

Your link takes me to the CSH forum list.......  confused I think something has gone wrong with your link.  smile

 

"The beautiful is as useful as the useful...perhaps more so."

from Les Miserables

Wed 29-Jun-11
10:30 am
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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Ok, will try again. whistle

Heritage seed library link

Wed 29-Jun-11
11:29 am
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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welldone Barbara!

I'll try that again!

Wed 29-Jun-11
5:27 pm
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kayerunrig
lincolnshire

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im a great believer in old varieties , just on the grounds that if you save your own seed each year they gradually adapt to the ground and enviroment around them , never had any great sucess  with F1 varieties at all ,always seem to look good but lack in taste ..Strawberries have travelled 3 times , and were originally given to me by an old lady probably mongrels, all i know is we have huge ones , warty ones and little ones and theyre good!

Wed 29-Jun-11
7:52 pm
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Toffeeapple said:

It's the same with bananas, in the whole world, only one variety is sold commercially, so if there were to be a disease that wiped out that variety, we'd have no commercial back-up.  There are other varieties but they are not grown in great enough quantity to replace the other.

I went to Brazil a few times and on one trip I was given a banana, it was a little thing not like the big yellow ones you get in Europe and it had quite a different taste too, kind of perfumey if I remember rightly.

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