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Memories
Tue 21-Dec-10
12:24 pm
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bobbyW
Suffolk

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As I approach my twilight years,  I often catch myself revisting the past. 

Remember the days when the BBC TV presenters spoke proper Oxford English, no violence, swearing or jive street talk was to be seen or heard? (you could leave the back door open in them days so next door could bring your washing off the line for you if it rained).

Radio Caroline on 199 medium wave  & Radio London on the tranny, Clitheroe Kid and the Navy Lark on the wireless, hippy bells and flower power, was it really as much fun as I'd like to remember, or was it the fact that I did not have to worry about paying the bills at my tender age?

Today I have a nice warm reliable car to sit amongst the traffic jams, paying a fiver a gallon for the pleasure, back in those days the family transport was a motorcycle combination that took on holiday once a year all over the country on uncrowded roads, loaded with an ex WD tent and everything that the four of us + dog needed for a fortnight at a beach location.

Petrol was 4/6d a gallon and a penny shot of Red X, half a crown a night camp site fees and cooking on the 1940's primus stove with a pressure cooker, heaven!

I managed to find this photo of the old lady, taken with the very same "Eastman Kodak Company" Box Brownie No.1 camera that I have amongst my treasured items.

BSA M20 500cc with Double Adult sidecar.

What era do you prefer?

"I THINK MY GUARDIAN ANGEL DRINKS"

Tue 21-Dec-10
2:47 pm
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Michelle from Oregon
Oregon, USA

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bobbyW said:

 was it really as much fun as I'd like to remember, or was it the fact that I did not have to worry about paying the bills at my tender age?


 I think you hit the nail on the head Bobby. When you are young, yeah you have worries, but not like the ones you have now. Loosing your job, paying the morgage every month, putting food on the table, all of those things don't occor to you when your six or ten or twelve.

I had a good childhood myself. The things I remember.....the funny thing is, I remember,

we weren't poor. Other people were poor, but we weren't. There was aways food on the table, it may not be something you liked particulary, but this is whats being served so you eat it.

And we mannaged vacations, tent camping was the thing for us, but we'd go to a campground with a lake or a pool and it was fun. One summer when I was ten, all of us (I am the youngest of 5)got a job in the field hoeing beets, and thats how we paid for a vacation to Disneyland, we worked for it. But that wasn't hard, that was fun then. And we were so proud of ourselves, we all put our money together and my Mom, my Grandmother and all of the kids went.

Wow, where did those memories come from? Thanks Bobby!big_hug

If you can't be a shining example, be a terrible warning!

Fri 4-Feb-11
10:26 pm
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bobbyW
Suffolk

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Watching the traffic today, I noticed a mobile greengrocery van go by, not seen one of those for a while I thought. Next was the Tesco home delivery van, the new age...or is it?

At the age of 7 until the day I left school,  I was a bread van saturday boy. My pals also worked with tradesmen for pocket money, one on the mobile shop, another on the pop wagon (corona) then the co-op electric vans with fruit & veg , another with weekly shopping orders (not so new after all), and the milkman, the butchers boy on the trade bike and finally my mate Stan on the front & rear carrier trade cycle with horse feed delivery.

What comes to mind is just how many occupations have been lost over the years, I eventually went on the bread vans properly, there were 28 retail bakery rounds in one small bakery, there were three bakeries in the area each keeping two shifts working 6 days a week and serving a 30 mile radius, all made a good living from serving their bi-daily customers who were all known by name.  

Folk had no need to drive to the shops, so no car or petrol required, more money to spare for the fresh produce which  in the case of a loaf, just 1p dearer than a shop.

How much to have shopping delivered today by a nameless person with no time to speak...£10 a time ?

Rose tinted glasses maybe, I think I prefer that way of life to today.

 

"I THINK MY GUARDIAN ANGEL DRINKS"

Fri 4-Feb-11
10:46 pm
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Terrier
York

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Not seen this post before, but as I've now read it, I thought I'd add my twopeneth.

When I was a kid, we owned the village shop, our christmas pressies were what ever mum didn't get sold in the shop.

On a saturday, Mum would get cream cakes delivered with the bread, and we'd spend all day nipping in to the shop to see if they had been sold yet (we got them for tea if they were still there at closing time)

We didn't open the shop on a sunday, but had to go to sunday school, so that my dad could have a lie in in peace and quiet.

We had to deliver papers before and after school, the hill be the school was ENORMOUS, it was SO BIG, you had to get off your bike and PUSH it up the hill, (been back since and it's a tiny little sloping lane).

Mum used to buy sides of bacon, which she had to bone, smoke and roll up herself - which we loved as it meant Bacon Bones for tea - the nearest thing nowadays is pork ribs, but these were HUGE.

The 'pop' man came round once a week, the milkman every day, we sold home produce including bent carrots and odd shaped potatoes, I can remember fags were 2/6 for 20 No6, cheese was 9 old pence a pound, and you got 8 blackjacks for 1d.

How I wish we still had the shop and the lovely old house that it was attached to, but then again maybe not, it must be pretty hard for village shops nowadays, what with all these superstores. But I still think - ah, those were the days

Fri 4-Feb-11
10:51 pm
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danast
Argyll, Scotland

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wave  I still live a wee bit in the old way of life.  Every week I have a van comes round.  From it I buy all my fish, fruit and vegetables all bought from the market in Glasgow that morning.   He also sells bacon and cheese, herbs, and spices.  He is my lifesaver.

 I also have once a month my dog food man, as I call him,  who delivers all my dog food, dog treats, hen food, bird seed and peanuts.  When you live 20 miles from town these vans save you so much.  

I remember many years ago when I used to visit my Nana on Loch Sween,  the grocery van came once a week.  From it us kids bought our sweets.  We had not much to spend and what sweets we bought had to be rationed for the week.  It was such a temptation to guzzle the sweets on the first day.  Nana did most of her shopping from this van.  She lived 20 miles from town too, but could not even go in by bus as it only came down once a day.  

 

Old teachers never die, they just lose their class

Fri 4-Feb-11
11:12 pm
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KateUK
uk

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When I was very young-5 ish-I found 1d in the street.I spent AGES sitting on teh back step deciding what to spend it on in the sweet shop.

4 fruit salads and 4 black jacks....one flying saucer and two shrimps...four shrimps...one shrimp,two black jacks,two fruit salads and some sherbert...or shall I save it until I have enough for a Jamboree bag...descisions,descisions.

When I told my daughter about this she thought I must have remembered it wrong, surely one penny couldn't have bought that many sweets?

Oh yes it could.

I can't remember what I decided on in the end,  the deciding was more fun than the purchasing, I can still remember the heaviness of that penny in my hand  as I skipped down the street

Kateuk makes things at http://www.etsy.com/shop/finkstuff and sometimes she does this too http://www54paintings.blogspot.com/ and also this http://finkstuff.weebly.com/

Fri 4-Feb-11
11:16 pm
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danast
Argyll, Scotland

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wave Oh Kate, it was cherry lips that I liked to buy.  You found a whole penny.  Wow, you must have felt quite rich.  whistle   But look what it bought you.  I remember getting 3d a week for pocket money.

Old teachers never die, they just lose their class

Fri 4-Feb-11
11:20 pm
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KateUK
uk

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I know Danuta, I was awe-struck. A whole penny. Amazing.I used to spend my pocket money on the Beano- to have some sweet money too was fabbo.

Kateuk makes things at http://www.etsy.com/shop/finkstuff and sometimes she does this too http://www54paintings.blogspot.com/ and also this http://finkstuff.weebly.com/

Fri 4-Feb-11
11:32 pm
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seth
lincolnshire fens

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Must have been about 8 when a Schwepps lorry lost it's load on a corner 3 of us were promised a fizzy orange for helping the driver to clear up , broken glass was carefully put into crates full bottles into the stinging nettles behind us . After our orange and the lorries departure we stuffed our shirts and rode our bikes to Stan's grans yard  we drank orange,bitter lemon ,tonic water ,ginger ale and was muchly flaming_nora .Next day we got over 10bob on the empty bottles !

 

 

 

 

S'pose I deserve the 13

Seed catalogues are responsible for more unfulfilled fantasies than the web and playboy combined . (after Michael Perry)

Sat 5-Feb-11
1:53 pm
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paperman
Saxmundham, Suffolk

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I grew up in Crystal Palace, South Lonjdon and bought my first car for £40.00 in 1962, it was a 1949 Austin Devon. Petrol was 3/11d a gallon and if I was short I used to put 25% parafin into the tank which was OK as long as the engine was hot but otherwise it was a pig to start from cold but as we lived at the top of a steep hill on those mornings I would bump start it down the hill. We had deliveries to our door of potatoes, lemonade, bread, milk and the kleen-eazy man would come once a month as would our insurance man to collect the premiums. I remember one winter the milkmans horse fell over coming into our road in the snow and we all had to lend lifting the poor old thing up.

I have reached an age where my train of thought often leaves the station without me...

Sat 5-Feb-11
3:20 pm
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ep
Bulgaria

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I have press cuttings when the local dray horse ran a'muck as they say and went straight through the window of my grandma's fish and chip shop....'bit too big to go in whole but wait a moment' or 'was that with chips sir?'  She also used to make crisps that she sold to the local working men's clubs and when I asked for crisps it was....do you want your Grans.....that was a nice touch.

Living out in Bulgaria we have the two mobile village shops every day and if they don't have it on they will bring it for you the next day.  Some of the women have not been out of the village for years.  It makes you stop and think....I do one shop a month thereabouts in the main town and it's only for the coffee home brand that the local shops don't sell , butter since most make it in the village but it's not to my liking and meat for the freezer.  When it was snowy and the man ran out of bread, he came back an hour later so that he could 'service' the customers.  Now I have most things from him.  He deserves my custom....even if I do pay a little over the odds.okok

Who lives long sees much : The diary of my life in Bulgaria

Sat 5-Feb-11
3:23 pm
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brightspark
Wilts

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Mars Bars and Wagon Wheels were bigger then !! ok  eeek

"Work for a cause, not for applause
Live life to express, not to impress
Don't strive to make your presence noticed
Just make your absence felt"
Sat 5-Feb-11
4:20 pm
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bobbyW
Suffolk

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ep said: brightspark said:

Mars Bars and Wagon Wheels were bigger then !! ok  eeek


 

You may laugh, but I actually wrote to the makers of Wagon Wheels to complain about the size of them compared to when I was a child.

The did reply saying

"Dear sir,

have you taken into consideration that your hands may have gotten bigger?"

 

They did enclose a complimentary pack of sweets though.

 

Anyone remember Tiger Nuts?

"I THINK MY GUARDIAN ANGEL DRINKS"

Sat 5-Feb-11
4:33 pm
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brightspark
Wilts

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I've never heard of them, Bob, what did they taste like?

"Work for a cause, not for applause
Live life to express, not to impress
Don't strive to make your presence noticed
Just make your absence felt"
Sat 5-Feb-11
6:16 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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I'm loving all this reminiscence!  BS picture of Tiger Nuts here, I used to love them, probably still do but you don't see them in the shops as frequently now.

I'm remembering the milk-man brought great churns of milk on his horse and cart and we kept our milk in jugs.  The Corona lorry with it's triangular appearance and the Rag and Bone man with his horse and cart.  The grocery shop sold broken biscuits more cheaply that whole ones and they were all on display in open boxes, the bacon was sliced on a big red slicer and tea was loose unless you wanted posh tea.  Home and Colonial store was lower down the hill in the town as was the Maypole, the Pork Butcher, and the Green Grocer.  Ah, such memories!

I'll try that again!

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