The Cottage Smallholder


stumbling self sufficiency in a small space

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Memories
Fri 25-Feb-11
10:31 pm
Avatar
Heather E
Rubery, Worcestershire

Knowledegable
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 344
Member Since:
Sun 5-Sep-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hattie said:

 

 

runaway¦¦¦¦OMG¦¦.This one is even more 'squirmy'¦¦¦>>


Thanks for the warning, Hattie.  I think I'll skip this one. flaming_noraflaming_noraflaming_nora(Weak stomach, you see.)
 

Gone crazy. Back soon.

Sat 26-Feb-11
5:10 am
Avatar
Hattie
Bucks/Oxon Border

Supreme Being
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 6920
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

wave  Joanna, 

I woke very early this morning (4.40am now......aargh ) so I had little search around for waterproof

fabrics one can buy online.  Just in case you decide to choose the easy option,rather than the

more primitive, let alone the stinky & sticky ones, of yore.  eeek  You could save those pleasures until

really necessary.....!!   smile   I came up with this link.....>>

http://www.croftmill.co.uk/products/waterproofs-pr.....ducts.html

 

 I thought the prices were pretty good .

They say they can deliver anywhere but I think that could be pretty expensive.  Maybe a visiting

friend or family member could bring it over.

 

 

 

"The beautiful is as useful as the useful...perhaps more so."

from Les Miserables

Sat 26-Feb-11
8:59 am
Avatar
Gottaknit
South Lincolnshire

Expert
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 561
Member Since:
Tue 9-Nov-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Icannot recommend Croft Mill too highly - I have been getting their stuff for YEARS. They are the reason I was able to afford to keep the children clothed. Fabric shops didn't (still don't) sell the useful stuff like waterproof coated nylon for parkas you can put in a pocket, proofed poplin or heavier for winter, fleece with a waterproof membrane, and all other sorts of fabrics of super quality, but not horrifying prices.

Might be worth an e-mail to them to ask how overseas postage charges would work out.wave

Sat 26-Feb-11
10:09 am
Avatar
Hattie
Bucks/Oxon Border

Supreme Being
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 6920
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Gottaknit, wave

They actually do have a page with that information on there site, BUT it comes as a bit of a shock as the prices would certainly put me off. I'm sure it is not the companies fault but the people who do the deliveries.

http://www.croftmill.co.uk/shipping-and-sampling/p.....annel.html

 

I think you are right about the quality of the products they look very good & I shall certainly be ordreing some for my own use.....I need a pair of waterproof trousers badly........It is raining again & the mud is ankle deep.......YUCK..... eeek

laugh

 

"The beautiful is as useful as the useful...perhaps more so."

from Les Miserables

Sun 27-Feb-11
6:14 am
Avatar
JoannaS
Latvia

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 4800
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I had forgotten about Croft Mill, thanks Jean and Nadine. My Mum lives nearby so maybe a possibility. cheers

Nadine those links are great, not sure I will go so far as to tanning a stomach but the other one looks good. A friend of mine was wanting to learn how to tan some rabbit skins so you never know, might come in handy.cheers

We can also get linseed oil really easily in fact we have oiled some doors with it rather than use varnish just recently so maybe give that a go on a trial milk bottle carrying bag. I need to make a bag that carries two one litre bottles as our milk lady leaves all milk at the bottom of the stairs at the furtherest door away from me in our apartment block - fine in summer but with the ice first thing in the morning I need something a little more secure than just carrying them in my hands.doh

Sun 27-Feb-11
4:26 pm
Avatar
Heather E
Rubery, Worcestershire

Knowledegable
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 344
Member Since:
Sun 5-Sep-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Is this link helpful, Joanna?  It may be worth you looking around wine sections of supermarkets as they sometimes offer plastic carriers that will take 6 bottles - free if you're lucky!  We've got 2 that have lasted ages.  The normal 75cl bottles fit easily, and maybe they would take 1 ltr bottles at a push.

Gone crazy. Back soon.

Sun 27-Feb-11
5:41 pm
Avatar
JoannaS
Latvia

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 4800
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

These aren't thin bottles unfortunately and we don't have those kinds of bags available in our village. I can get hold of jute though or linen really cheaply if I go to one of the big towns and need to do that soon as I need a haircut.cheers Hadn't thought of using jute so thanks for that

Mon 14-Mar-11
5:59 pm
Avatar
Danny
Scarborough, England
Admin
Forum Posts: 5516
Member Since:
Sat 12-Aug-06
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

bobbyW said:

There's a crossroads near Newmarket with a wooden cross on a grave bearing the inscription

"To Joseph, An unknown Gypsy Boy R. I. P". There are differing versions of the story surrounding the grave. http://www.grantham.karoo.net/paul/graves/gypsyboy.htm

The story I was told when I first saw it was of a gipsy boy being hunted for stealing a sheep, a hanging offence, he hid in a tree and was brought food by his family. One night he fell whilst asleep and broke his neck in the crook of a branch. Nobody truly knows the real story, but every day, fresh flowers and coins appear on the site yet nobody is ever seen tending it.

 Maybe Danny & Fiona will know of it and share their version.

Any gents /ladies/travellers in your memories?


 

That's about five miles from us, Bob, on our route home from Norwich when we brach off the A11 towards Moulton. We cannot add much other than whetever the cause of death was believed to have been an injustice of some description. Some Radio and TV commentators do refer to the colours being displayed on the grave come Derby Day, which of course is held far away in Epsom, not in Newmarket

The travelling community figured large in our lives. A great number favoured the old fashioned gypsy carts while others settled into local authority housing with varying degrees of success and integration.

One lady in particular called to our door regularly. Us kids would sing out "The beggarwoman is here", not in any malicious way - that's how she was known to us kids. My mum was very kindly and would always have some food or hand-me-down for her. They were quite friends, after a fashion. I think my mum had a reputation locally as a "good woman".

When she ran her B&B business each summer, we were moved into bunk beds in the adjoining lean-to garage and converted store house and then we were allowed into our own rooms again during the off season. There was a door from the kitchen into the garage.

One stormy winter night there was a knock on the door. A young travelling family, father, mother and a number of kids asked for shelter for the night. My mum put them up in the garage. I often think back on that, trying to recall whether or not she locked the access door. Probably not, as she would have been sensitive to their feelings. I wonder if my dad got a wink of sleep that night!

Never knowingly underfed

Tue 15-Mar-11
7:03 pm
Avatar
JoannaS
Latvia

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 4800
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Love this story Danny, makes your Mum sound like someone I would love to have metcheers

Tue 15-Mar-11
8:05 pm
Avatar
Danny
Scarborough, England
Admin
Forum Posts: 5516
Member Since:
Sat 12-Aug-06
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I really enjoyed the early memories that some of you posted on here. Your Sunday stories were very amusing.  In my case (southern Irish, RC) aged about 9 or 10 the big deal was to get on the altar boy team. The uniform was a scarlet cassock with a white œtop (I cannot recall the term) trimmed with lace on the waist and wrists with black brothel sneakers " as I later came to know them.

Flash and v. cool at that age.

A strict and jealously observed roster included one of two Sunday Masses (9 and 12) and every second week on duty for daily Mass at 08:00.

There was a rotated hierarchy of three main roles who were active during the ceremony although there could be a dozen altar boys in attendance on Sundays. Only the three main roles were œplayers. Called œserving 1st, serving 2nd and œserving 3rd.

I have forgotten the precise details but 1st was the plum job. 1st was the captain, led the team out, rang the hand bell at appropriate points, got to move the bible from right to left for the epistle and gospel etc.

2nd got to light the candles and extinguish them afterwards " a big deal as the ones at the back of our altar must have been 8 or 9 feet from wick to ground. The task required a long pole device ,with a lighting taper attached, to ignite and cup thingy to extinguish them. What a joy for a small boy!

3rd got to attend the priest as he served communion at the altar rail, holding a paten beneath the chin of each recipient to prevent any stray crumbs of the host from falling on the ground.

My dad used to regale me with a description of an incident that I never remembered. The parish priest at the time was a sulky and short tempered, wizened old guy. One Sunday, he was walking down the steps from the altar to serve communion at the communion rail when I happened to walk across his path, presumably on the legitimate course of my duties but maybe my timing was out. According to my dad, the priest became infuriated and aimed a haymaker at my head. Apparently, I ducked like a boxer, the blow missed, and everybody carried on as though nothing had happened.

Never knowingly underfed

Fri 25-Mar-11
1:59 pm
Avatar
seth
lincolnshire fens

Councillor
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 1381
Member Since:
Fri 10-Sep-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

All the boatrace news reminds me that it's 60years since I was taken to see it . Saw Oxford sink on the tele on sat. race abandoned it was re-run on monday and Stan's dad (next door ) took us to see it, went to Chiswick  watched them past and ran back to car to hear the finish Cambridge won . Must have been Easter monday.

Seed catalogues are responsible for more unfulfilled fantasies than the web and playboy combined . (after Michael Perry)

Sun 18-Dec-11
2:55 pm
Avatar
bobbyW
East Suffolk almost near the sea and the Castle on the Hill.

Expert
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 643
Member Since:
Sun 25-Jul-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
102sp_Permalink sp_Print

I'm fed up with the 21st century shops...
lets go back to the old fashioned Co-op with those fantastic metal cups containing the money tendered and sales ticket that flew across the shop on a wire to the cash office, then flew back with your change. If I swept the sawdust on the butchery dept floor, I could pull the handle to fire it (had to be lifted up though).  laugh

"NEVER RIDE FASTER THAN YOUR GUARDIAN ANGEL CAN FLY"
Your future self is watching you right now through memories

Sun 18-Dec-11
3:30 pm
Avatar
Hattie
Bucks/Oxon Border

Supreme Being
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 6920
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
103sp_Permalink sp_Print

I remember those, very exciting for children to watch. my grandmother use to take me to a haberdashery shop in Ascot which had this system.In the grocers I used to love the big square boxes which held the loose biscuits you bought by weight; they had glass lids so you could see inside.  magic for children....!!   smile

 

"The beautiful is as useful as the useful...perhaps more so."

from Les Miserables

Sun 18-Dec-11
3:53 pm
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16337
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
104sp_Permalink sp_Print

I remember those things too.  We had two department stores in Abertillery, the Pontlottyn and the Bon Marché (pronounced by the locals as bon marsh).  One of them had a wire and pulley method of invoicing and paying and the other had the vacuum tubes.  I have just found out that the Pontlottyn is now a pub.

I'll try that again!

Sun 18-Dec-11
3:54 pm
Avatar
Aly
Normandy France

Supreme Being
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 9516
Member Since:
Sun 2-Oct-11
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
105sp_Permalink sp_Print

the shop staff also were pleased to serve you unlike today when they mostly don't even look at you so as not to interrupt their chat with the girl on the next tillsteam

I had a Saturday job in Woolies on the till and had to add up the purchases in my head then ring up the exact amount and work out what change was needed.

Trying to enjoy life as it is

http://www.letertregites.com

Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 767

Currently Online:
32 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

brightspark: 10531

danast: 10232

Aly: 9516

Sooliz: 8083

Hattie: 6920

Ambersparkle: 6690

JoannaS: 4800

Terrier: 4518

eileen54: 4424

Xahha: 4231

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 9

Members: 15955

Moderators: 2

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 6

Forums: 25

Topics: 2272

Posts: 123037

Newest Members:

Oredelamara, sancusimand, liokidwellvirgi, gbridgeeddy, miagiphy4673, Ali Boo

Moderators: Toffeeapple: 16337, AdminTA: 10

Administrators: fn: 333, Danny: 5516


Copyright © 2006-2012 Cottage Smallholder      Our Privacy Policy      Advertise on Cottage Smallholder