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Fudge
Sun 23-Jan-11
11:36 pm
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Terrier
York

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Right, I have two recipes to share with you, both dead simple

Choc fudge

100g dark choc, chopped into small bits, 1 can condensed milk, 2 oz unsalter butter, 8oz sugar.

put milk,sugar & butter into a pan and warm slowly, stirring until sugar has disolved (doesn't sound or feel gritty when stirring) " bring up to boil and KEEP STIRRING SLOWLY, it literally takes a couple of minutes to reach the soft ball stage " fill a jug with water and drop a small amount of the mix into the jug " if you can then pick it up with a teaspoon and it stays as a lump, then it's ready. Add chocolate and stir/beat like mad until incorporated. Pour in to a greased container (silicone is best " about 7" square) and spread it out quickly " it sets fast. " resist eating till cold.

Baileys Fudge

150g white choc, chopped into small bits, 1pint whipping cream, 50ml Baileys, 1lb golden granulated sugar (however i didn't have any, so I used golden caster sugar).

put cream, sugar & baileys in a pan and warm slowly, until sugar has disolved (see above re grittiness), turn heat up to a rolling boil and boil for about 6 mins, again test for settting as above, add the choc and beat like crazy again, pour into same size tray as above and again resist till cold.

Points to note for both recipes

They really are simple, but keep stirring

silicon baking trays save all the faff with lining a metal tray and greasing " they are BRILL for this recipe, and also choc brownies.

They both set fast, so be quick with the spreading " use a spatula

the 'soft ball' test is simple " much esier than setting point for jams or any such pains in the a¦e

You gotta try the baileys one " it is unbelievably good

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Mon 24-Jan-11
10:18 am
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OdelleS
Cleveland,North-East,U.K.

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cheers  Drooling....... 'Baileys Fudge', ah, that's on my agenda for today, ooh, thank you!

Your stall looks great, you've been ever so busy preparing all those delicious goodies, no problems there with you're abilities, bet it was a sell out, if I could've been there.....

Thanks for the recipes & photo's.  I'm one very happy lady!  I hope that you're proud, you deserve to be, it's got to be the 'Baileys Fudge' first though I think, the tips are a great idea. magicwaveOdelle.

Mon 24-Jan-11
10:52 am
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brightspark
Wilts

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Thanks, Janet, your recipes are now in my 'must do' folder!!

Well done on your stall - what a pity there was a low turnout.

Was there sufficient advertising, do you think, or maybe just the cold weather kept people away?

Running a stall is a tricky business, isn't it?

Where we used to live, just outside Reading, in a reasonably well-off village, our charity knitting group stall usually took about £300 each year - a number of our lady knitters are excellent cooks, too, and we sold absolutely anything that would raise money - biscuits; cakes; savouries; penny sweets; knitted garments; bric-a-brac; secondhand books; plants.

However, 18 months ago, I paid for a stall in a village near here (Wiltshire), and yet we came away with about £60. Quite disheartening after our more successful stalls in Berkshire.

brightsparklystuff

"How do you spell 'Love'?" (Piglet). 

"You don't spell it, you feel it" (Pooh).

 'A hug,' said Pooh 'is always the right size!' 

Mon 24-Jan-11
11:48 am
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OdelleS
Cleveland,North-East,U.K.

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Toffeeapple said:

What a great idea.  I do hope it goes well, at least you have the strategy right!  I love nougat too though it was never a Christmas gift, I used to get a little tin of Blue Bird toffees.


Oh Nougat, love it, do you remember 'montilimar' in Black Magic Chocolates, I used to love that, the Nougat was perfect with a coating of dark chocolate, wonder if they still make it, wish I could but that individually! cheers for reminding me. 

Odelle. wave

Mon 24-Jan-11
1:23 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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Try these links Odelle.  I've been to Montelimar but the Nougat there was too expensive to buy locally.

I'll try that again!

Mon 24-Jan-11
1:44 pm
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mike.
Coventry

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We have had a couple of goes at making fudge, including chocolate, baileys, ginger. I was surprised at how easy it was but it does involve a lot of stirring. We kind of went mad before christmas and made tons of it but we did give most away as prezzies. Surprisingly we've still got some left over! And I'll agree that a silicone baking tray definitely makes it easier to turn out. We use one with a square of baking paper in the bottom. I can't remember if we use a squirt of the 'low cal' spray oil too, just to reduce the chances of it sticking to the tray.

Visit my blog for food, drink, photography and hamsters.

Mon 24-Jan-11
8:22 pm
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Terrier
York

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I've never had anything stick to the silcone baking tray, the one I have is about 7" square and as I said it's perfect for cooking anything that is likely to stick. I also swear by those silicone liner sheets that you can pick up in the £ shops. Brill for loads of things that make a mess of your baking trays - sausages, chops, things with sticky sauces.

Hope you're all successful with the fudge - slowly working our way through what I didn't sell, although it should keep for the next stall in early Feb.

BS - on the stall thingy, I normally take around £60 at time, which I know for a day of baking isn't that great an hourly rate, but it's all about the fun of doing it, experimenting with recipes, and being able to nosy around all the other stalls, got a lovely little cabinet thingy to display my homemade lip balms and sinus rubs for £2.50. In the end provided it pays for itself, then I'm happy. Now I've built up a stock of my preserves and jewellery, then it's all fun.

Mon 14-Feb-11
6:28 pm
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Galicia
GALICIA

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The last time I made fudge was about 15 years ago and I remember it being grainy, anyone know why it turns out grainy at all ? I thought i might give it another go after reading this.

Thu 22-Sep-11
3:27 am
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sanshojapan

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I am working my way through all the posts slowly!

 

This is a recipe for fudge from my grandmother, who died in the sixties aged seventy something. My father typed it out for me on his Olivetti, along with a recipe for Christmas pudding when I left for Japan in 1974! He obviously thought it was important!

 

Swiss Milk Toffee

1 1/2lbs of granulated sugar

1 small tin of condensed milk

1 small tin of water

1 dsp. golden syrup

1 oz. butter

Few drops of vanilla essence

 

Put all except vanilla in a pan. Melt slowly, stirring all the time. Bring to the boil and boil for 20 minutes. Take off heat, add vanilla and stir briskly until it thickens. (I remember my grandmother beating it to get air in the mixture). Pour into a greased tin.

I also remember my grandmother scoring it so it would break into bits easily. I haven't  eaten it for years coz of all the sugar, but I remember it was divine.

Thu 22-Sep-11
10:13 pm
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Terrier
York

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I think the grainy texture is something to do with if you don't gently disolve the sugar, and then remember to beat it well at the end. Made my fudge loads of times now and never had a problem

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