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Yorkshire Parkin
Fri 5-Apr-13
4:48 pm
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Sooliz
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This is the recipe I always use for Parkin - link here - it comes out beautifully every time. 

One or two people in the Comments below the written recipe haven't had success with it....don't know why, I've never found it to be dry (I think one person at least misread the instructions!).

learning to love veg…..except celery :-O

Fri 5-Apr-13
8:43 pm
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brambleberry
Toronto, Canada

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This is very similar to a recipe I got from my mother (who was from the East coast of Scotland) although hers didn't have oatmeal in it. I must give yours a try and compare. I like it because you can basically mix the whole thing in the saucepan. My recipe has chunks of ginger in it and we call it gingercake.

Home is where the heart is.

Fri 5-Apr-13
8:58 pm
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Sooliz
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That's what I do, Chris - I don't bother mixing the dry ingredients in a separate bowl as per the recipe (why make more washing up?!), I do it all in the saucepan.  The oatmeal gives it a bit of bite, a nice added texture.

learning to love veg…..except celery :-O

Sat 6-Apr-13
11:05 am
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Toffeeapple
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Oh, you have beaten me to it!  I give you - Mrs Birchenough's Parkin (not Mrs Meppham's - it's her Christmas cake that I tried, just the once...)

Mrs Birchenough’s Parkin

1lb fine oatmeal                      1lb Golden Syrup

1 cup plain flour                      1 cup milk

¼ lb. lard                               1 tsp. soda           2 tsp. baking powder

2 **dessert spoons sugar                 1 tsp. ground ginger

*Note - Cups would have been British teacups, not what we are used to now.

**A dessert spoon equals three teaspoons.

 

Melt the lard with the syrup and ginger. In a separate pan warm the milk.  Add oatmeal and flour to the lard mixture.  Mix warmed milk with soda and add to first mixture. Add in baking powder and mix thoroughly.  Pour the batter into a square cake tin, lined with buttered greaseproof paper (baking parchment is fine).  Bake for one hour at 150C - 325F  -  Gas Mark 3. 

I'll try that again!

Sat 6-Apr-13
11:23 am
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Sooliz
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Wow, very different quantities surprised.  A lot more oatmeal and syrup, a lot less ginger.  I think I'll try your (or Mrs Birchenough's - what a name!) recipe and see how it differs in terms of texture and taste, although I will add more ginger.

I love how recipes differ according to geographical location, availability of ingredients or just plain individual preferences, it's all so interesting.

learning to love veg…..except celery :-O

Sat 6-Apr-13
11:26 am
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Toffeeapple
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Mrs Birchenough is a Yorkshire woman so you can't mess with what she says.  No egg you notice and only ginger for spice.  I hope it works for you.

I'll try that again!

Sat 6-Apr-13
12:34 pm
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Hattie
Bucks/Oxon Border

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How interesting to see the differences in the two recipes....I shall have to try them both now...Oh my I wonder how much weight I will put on.......ponder whistle

Thank you both for posting them.  big_hug

 

"The beautiful is as useful as the useful...perhaps more so."

from Les Miserables

Sat 6-Apr-13
12:41 pm
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Toffeeapple
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You have one slice of each, then give the rest to the chickens, of course...wink

I'll try that again!

Sat 6-Apr-13
12:41 pm
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Toffeeapple
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You have one slice of each, then give the rest to the chickens, of course...wink

I'll try that again!

Sat 6-Apr-13
4:05 pm
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brightspark
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TA, I thought a dessertspoon is equal to two teaspoons; it is the tablespoon that is equal to three teaspoons.

teaspoon = 5 ml

dessertspoon = 10 ml

tablespoon = 15 ml

 

In your recipe, are they level, rounded or heaped spoons ........ ? smile

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Live life to express, not to impress
Don't strive to make your presence noticed
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Sat 6-Apr-13
4:33 pm
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brightspark
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Here is the sticky gingerbread/parkin recipe:

 

Sticky Gingerbread

Okay – just to let you know that the recipe I found was from 1967 and from 'Marguerite Patten's Recipe Collection' – sets of cards, and housed in boxes. The recipes featured were alternated in black/white, then colour – this one is in black/white, and is Card No.20 'Family Cakes'. It is entitled 'Sticky Gingerbread and Parkin'.

The photograph on the card is courtesy of Fowlers West India Treacle, so I guess that was the inspiration for the recipe.

Cook – 1¼-1½ hours; 7” square tin;

Oven: slow 300-325 deg F (150-160C), Gas Mk 2 in centre of oven

12 portions:

4 ozs margarine or lard (I used butter)

6 ozs black treacle

2ozs golden syrup (OR use all black treacle)

¼ pt milk

8 ozs plain flour

2 ozs brown sugar

1 level teaspoon mixed spice

1 level teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

1 – 2 level teaspoons ground gingerbread

2 eggs

Warm margarine, black treacle and syrup.

Add milk, then allow to cool.

Sieve dry ingredients into a bowl, add the treacle mixture and the eggs.

Beat well.

Pour into a lined tin.

Bake for time and temperatures given until firm to the touch.

TO VARY

Yorkshire Parkin:

Use 3 ozs lard instead of 4 ozs;

and instead of 8 ozs flour use the following:

4 ozs plain flour;

4 ozs medium oatmeal or rolled oats;

¼ level teaspoon salt

Make it stiffer with only 1 egg and 5 tablespoons milk.

STORAGE:

Allow gingerbread to store for several days before cutting.

Parkin can be eaten fresh.

 

"Work for a cause, not for applause
Live life to express, not to impress
Don't strive to make your presence noticed
Just make your absence felt"
Sat 6-Apr-13
4:36 pm
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Toffeeapple
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In answer to your question Val, I think they would have been slightly heaped but it is so long since I baked that I really can't remember.

I'll try that again!

Mon 6-May-13
9:19 pm
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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When I first moved to the UK, an English tablespoon was 4 teaspoons, and a dessert spoon was 3 teaspoons. An American tablespoon was, and is, 3 teaspoons. Now the tablespoons are about the same, nominally 15 ml, 1/2 liquid ounce. I got a tablespoon and dessert spoon specially, and an English teaspoon, to use with English recipes, and used my American measuring spoons with American recipes.

I haven't compared the recipes to the one I use, from an old ABC of simple cooking ( or a similar name). Last November was the first time in years and years that I didn't make any.

Mon 6-May-13
10:46 pm
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eileen54
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I have never known an english tablespoon to be 4 teaspoons, all my cooking life 50yrs it has always been 3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon.

Never give up Tomorrow is another day.

Tue 7-May-13
6:43 am
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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Then the English teaspoon was larger than the American one. Certainly an English tablespoon was four American teaspoons when I came to the UK in the 1960s. Maybe that was because American teaspoons were measured level, and English ones were heaped.

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