The Cottage Smallholder


stumbling self sufficiency in a small space

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Best seed company?
Fri 26-Feb-10
1:56 pm
Avatar
danast
Argyll, Scotland

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 10232
Member Since:
Thu 24-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi and welcome to the forum.  I too am trying the Real Seed Company for the first time for some of my seeds. I like the idea of collecting seeds for the next year from your own plants.  We shall see how it goes.

You should get some hens if you can manage them.  They are wonderful and fresh eggs are just heavenly. the colour of the yolks is incredible.

Old teachers never die, they just lose their class

Wed 31-Mar-10
4:08 pm
Avatar
Jude
Swannington, Norfolk

Improver
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 55
Member Since:
Sun 27-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Real Seeds are a brilliant company! I also save and swap a lot of my own seeds! 

Tue 6-Apr-10
12:06 am
Avatar
Vagabondic
Bucks

Improver
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 79
Member Since:
Sat 20-Feb-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I am a great fan of Simpsons Seeds who are specialists in tomatoes and chillies but do other stuff as well. Their service is excellent as is Tuckers in my experience and the latter's use of resealable bags is so much of an advantage - when the bought seeds are used I can re-use the pouches for my own saved seed.

I have bought a few on ebay or the first time this year - very cheap and the delivery was next day,  this was from a company called "the seed merchant" - everythingI have planted of there has germinated well to date.

It may be perverse but I would rather use a small company than one of the large ones,  nothing against the large seed businesses other than getting an e-mail every other day from Thompson and Morgan with some alledged bargain (I also find Harrod Horticultural guilty of an over use of e-mail) Thre also seems to be a general rule that the glossier the catalogue and larger the photos the more expensive the end product.

Tue 6-Apr-10
7:45 am
Avatar
Jude
Swannington, Norfolk

Improver
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 55
Member Since:
Sun 27-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have also used Simpson's. They are very good and have fast delivery as Vagabondic rightly points out.

Fri 4-Jun-10
8:42 am
Avatar
devongarden
Devon, UK

Councillor
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 1294
Member Since:
Thu 7-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have just looked at the AgroForestry site. We had a tour of the Forest Garden there yesterday evening, and it was full of interesting plants. The list of seeds (there is another of plants) is long, and gives some details of how plants can be used. Did you know that the shoots of Solomon's Seal (polygonatum odoratum) and of hostas are edible? You eat the shoots, then let the plants grow so you still get the flowers. The name of the site makes it sound like a large, nasty company somehow--it isn't, it is small, and a trust doing research into Forest Gardens.

Joanna, I thought of you when it said hardy down to -25C for some plants, and some are even hardier. Also it lists lots of things that would work in an edible meadow. Daylilies have edible flowers, for example.

https://secure.agroforestry.co.uk/seeds2003.html

 

Fri 4-Jun-10
10:13 am
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16321
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

That's a very comprehensive site Barbara, thanks for that, it might take me some time to get through it...

I'll try that again!

Fri 4-Jun-10
2:53 pm
Avatar
JoannaS
Latvia

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 4800
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thanks for that Barbara, I am finding out quite a bit about edible plants from my Latvian friend but first I have to translate what she shows me so I can identify it. Just had a quick scan of the list and had a laugh at the alder, we have so much of that stuff in our woods, I don't think I need any seeds for it, it does quite well enough on its own that and downy birch (like silver birch but not weeping)Cheers I am interested in the wild ramson seeds though - I know they grown here but we haven't any in our forest and someone picked some the other week and they are tasty to throw in to food or salads if fresh.Ok

Sat 5-Jun-10
1:46 pm
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16321
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Mmm Ramsons, (or wild garlic) have spread in my garden this year and I've been enjoying the flowers and chopped young leaves in salads and mashed potato.  They are such pretty flower-heads.

I'll try that again!

Sat 5-Jun-10
2:04 pm
Avatar
danast
Argyll, Scotland

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 10232
Member Since:
Thu 24-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I bought a strawberry planter (pink) this year and some strawberry plants.  I planted them and left the planter in the polytunnel.  They are the biggest plants I have ever seen and yesterday I picked the first strawberry I have ever grown.  Oh the taste was wonderful - mouthwatering. Smug  Folks have been asking me what I have been feeding them on, but the truth is all they have had is water.  I have some wee wild strawberries growing outside and some of them are ready too.

Just thought that down south you may have been picking them for weeks now but my first was very special.  Oh and I had my first courgette for breakfast with scrambled eggs ( home grown too)    Wave

Old teachers never die, they just lose their class

Sat 5-Jun-10
2:24 pm
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16321
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I'm not overly keen on strawberries so I don't grow them but yours sound wonderful, especially the wild ones - now those I do like.  I like the idea of your pink planter too.

Home-grown eggs and courgette - lovely.  How did you prepare the courgette?

I'll try that again!

Sat 5-Jun-10
5:01 pm
Avatar
danast
Argyll, Scotland

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 10232
Member Since:
Thu 24-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I just sliced them, cooked them in a little oil with some mushrooms and then added the eggs.  They were still crunchy .

Old teachers never die, they just lose their class

Sat 5-Jun-10
6:00 pm
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16321
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Well that sounds good.  I'm not a big fan of courgettes but have been buying them recently to slice thinly to add to salads.

I'll try that again!

Sun 6-Jun-10
5:58 am
Avatar
JoannaS
Latvia

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 4800
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Courgettes (zucchini) are great for bulking soups and stews and a substitute for carrot in carrot cake (not quite the same colour of course but still a moist cake)Cheers

No permission to create posts
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 509

Currently Online:
46 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

brightspark: 10530

danast: 10232

Aly: 9516

Sooliz: 8076

Hattie: 6920

Ambersparkle: 6681

JoannaS: 4800

Terrier: 4518

eileen54: 4424

Xahha: 4231

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 9

Members: 16151

Moderators: 2

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 6

Forums: 25

Topics: 2268

Posts: 122966

Newest Members:

DavidCameron, courticev, McCullers, Rskingdom, AlyssaDay, stopjunkmail

Moderators: Toffeeapple: 16321, AdminTA: 10

Administrators: fn: 322, Danny: 5516


Copyright © 2006-2012 Cottage Smallholder      Our Privacy Policy      Advertise on Cottage Smallholder