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Growing vegetables indoors
Thu 30-May-13
9:00 pm
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eileen54
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I am reading on various sites that you can just continue sowing and planting veg all year , if they are indoors. Has anyone done this and had success? If so did you have to have grow lights or was there enough natural light?

Never give up Tomorrow is another day.

Thu 30-May-13
9:45 pm
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Vagabondic
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I've kept chillies indoors successfully for a few years,  moving them to a greenhouse in summer than back indoors in autumn - they are a perennial anyway and normally seem to come back stronger for a trim and re-pot.

The big problem with indoors is likely to be space - it's easy to plant seeds but as they grow you need a lot more space  for the plants - then as with this year there is the problem of moving young plants outside when conditions are unsuitable.

I have small plants on a windowsill but don't really want a pumpkin spreading through the living room which is my immediate vision of growing vegetables indoors.

Seriously though you are right that light is an issue- but so is heat and humidity, our homes are very different to outdoors and so for anything other than starting them off you should really consider whatever you want to grow as a houseplant and whether it will thrive in the conditions.

My father tried grow lamps with some success but I recall they used a lot of electricity and the light was of such an intensity it had to be in a room people didn't use much,  in his case the boiler house.

If you want to grow a lot indoors then hydroponics rather than soil is one solution which is rumoured to be the method used by cultivators of cannabis who it would seem do have a lot of success with their indoor methods.

Thu 30-May-13
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eileen54
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Thanks for the reply. I already grow everything indoors , I have no outside space. ie I live in a 1st floor apartment. I am already growing almost everything you can grow in pots , including carrots and runner beans , indoors quite successfully. I  was just wondering about planting more when these are finished. I don't want to use grow lights as I think these are a fire risk. ( think about how many cannabis factories go in flames).  I am intrigued by both aquaponics and aeroponics, but don't want to go there in this apartment as it is rented and I am wary of leaks. Also as aeroponics sprays mists of water I am not sure about having it in a living area.

Never give up Tomorrow is another day.

Fri 31-May-13
9:15 pm
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Vagabondic
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The grow lights I have seen are nothing more than a very big bulb,  therefore they are not at all dangerous,  as I understand it the reason cannabis factories burn down is they hack in to other people power supplies and the load being drawn by lots  of lights is very high.  If you merely replace a standard bulb with a grow light bulb there should be no problem if the fitting can deal with the current it draws -  a lot of free standing lamps say 60w max,  so they obviously cannot.

 

I agree that the spraying mists would be a problem in a domesticenvironment but a hydroponic system could work - the amount of water is not great.  The system I am trying at the moment is from a some people called Greenhouse Sensation in Lanacshire,  their customer service is excellent  - and I mean really  really good   - it is a basically a trough of water  nothing more, if you are worried abut leaks get a bigger trough to go outside it and act as a bund. I do not know yet if what they claim about their system is achievable (and I am sceptical enough to have the  default position of if something is too good to be true then it isn't  true)  but for me the outlay (£60 or so) is worth a try.

If a lack of light in the short days of winter is the concern then consider what things are grown in the arctic, one of my tomato varieties is called Alaskan Fancy - it claims to be ready much quicker then other types because of short winter days, although so far over the past couple of years   I havn't seen that born out in practice

Sat 1-Jun-13
2:36 pm
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eileen54
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looked at that site. Very interesting liked the rain and drain system , may well consider it.  I may also just plant some seeds later in the yr and see what happens.  I already have the seeds , compost and pots so nothing to lose.

Never give up Tomorrow is another day.

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