The Cottage Smallholder


stumbling self sufficiency in a small space

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Tips and tricks – finding and harvesting nature's resources
Mon 28-Sep-09
12:36 pm
Avatar
Danny
Scarborough, England
Admin
Forum Posts: 5516
Member Since:
Sat 12-Aug-06
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Tell us your techniques and sources (no secrets need be divulged). We think that this is a cornerstone of the self-sufficiency approach and sharing information helps more people to get started on this very satisfying activity.

Read these articles:

Foraging for hedgerow fruit. How to identify wild (cherry) plums, bullaces and wild damsons

A quick guide to identifying some hedgerow fruit

Never knowingly underfed

Mon 28-Sep-09
1:13 pm
Avatar
David B

Enthusiast
Members
Forum Posts: 143
Member Since:
Wed 23-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

One problem with wild plums is that they do vary a lot, and some look different from the examples in Danny's link, as mentioned in another thread.

Work calls now, but I think there is a photo either on my computer or still in my camera that shows fruit on the tree with the leaves. Wonder if it is detailed enough. If so, I'll post it soon, if not I'll try to get a pic of some fruit with the leaves. That should help people avoid picking anything that ain't some sort of plum.

David

Sat 3-Oct-09
8:03 pm
Avatar
JoannaS
Latvia

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 4800
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I tried pine needles for the first time this year. I never realised that the new pine needles are actually not that hard but they have a strong taste, a bit like eating a sage leaf raw but not quite. They are supposed to be very high in Vitamin C and sustained some of the Latvian population through the war years. Pine needles can be made into a tea apparently and I think I will give it a go sometime. This year I have picked wild mushrooms, chanterelles and beka (Latvian mushroom), and cranberries.

When I lived in England I used to pick bilberries from the moors and I have some fantastic pictures of the kids when they were young after eating bilberry crumble - certainly not recommended whilst wearing your Sunday best.

Sun 4-Oct-09
11:22 am
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16220
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

 When I lived in England I used to pick bilberries from the moors and I have some fantastic pictures of the kids when they were young after eating bilberry crumble - certainly not recommended whilst wearing your Sunday best.


I remember doing that on the mountains in Wales, we called them Wimberries and they had such a delicious flavour.  My mother used to make a wicked tart with them, I can taste it to this day.  All the children had purple hands an mouths in that season.Smile

I'll try that again!

Sun 4-Oct-09
11:40 am
Avatar
Danny
Scarborough, England
Admin
Forum Posts: 5516
Member Since:
Sat 12-Aug-06
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Same here, Toffeeapple. We used to call them Hurts (no idea why). They were a real treat and good patches were kept secret Embarassed

I love the idea of using pine needles, Joanna. Do all varieties work or are some recommended above others?

Never knowingly underfed

Sun 4-Oct-09
11:56 am
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16220
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Smile Don't you just love local names for things?

I'll try that again!

Sun 4-Oct-09
12:07 pm
Avatar
David B

Enthusiast
Members
Forum Posts: 143
Member Since:
Wed 23-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Toffeeapple said:

 When I lived in England I used to pick bilberries from the moors and I have some fantastic pictures of the kids when they were young after eating bilberry crumble - certainly not recommended whilst wearing your Sunday best.


I remember doing that on the mountains in Wales, we called them Wimberries and they had such a delicious flavour.  My mother used to make a wicked tart with them, I can taste it to this day.  All the children had purple hands an mouths in that season.Smile


I call them wimberries too. I think they are just about the best fruit for making tarts. I've also folded them into natural yogurt and made blueberry muffins from them. There are a pound or so of them in my Dad's freezer now - mine has overflowed.

David

Sun 4-Oct-09
12:18 pm
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16220
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

David, I am so envious!  It's been many years since I last tasted any.  I take it that you have access to a local source?  Blueberries taste nothing like them.Frown

I'll try that again!

Sun 4-Oct-09
12:42 pm
Avatar
JoannaS
Latvia

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 4800
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have been trying to read about the pine needle tea and as far as I can tell as long as you don't use Yew (rather poisonous) I think any pine needle will do. Apparently pregnant mothers should not drink it but apart from that it is supposed to be healthy.

Sun 4-Oct-09
12:49 pm
Avatar
David B

Enthusiast
Members
Forum Posts: 143
Member Since:
Wed 23-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Toffeeapple said:David, I am so envious!  It's been many years since I last tasted any.  I take it that you have access to a local source?  Blueberries taste nothing like them.Frown


There are quite a lot on the roadsides on the Prescelli hills, the best being where the sheep can't get. They are about 30 miles away, but I try and get one trip up there a year, just to pick. The best crop our family ever had was many years ago, and it was on Wimbledon Finals Day, so I always keep that in min.

This year, though, much to my astonishment, I've found a couple of sites in the old oak forests which survive in places on the banks of the upper reaches of Milford Haven, which are closer to home.

David

Sun 4-Oct-09
2:08 pm
Avatar
Amanda
Mid-Devon

Senior Class
Members
Forum Posts: 30
Member Since:
Mon 28-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Wombledon Finals?!  "And here, leaping the net, is Great Uncle Bulgaria - after a series of exciting matches, this year's Men's Wombledon Tennis champion" ... !

Has anyone used nettle leaves (for anything) and is it worth the effort?

Sun 4-Oct-09
2:12 pm
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16220
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Oh, you lucky man!

I'll try that again!

Sun 4-Oct-09
2:45 pm
Avatar
fn
Newmarket
Admin
Forum Posts: 321
Member Since:
Sat 12-Aug-06
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Has anyone used nettle leaves (for anything) and is it worth the effort?

Apparently cold nettle tea is a good fertiliser  for aubergine plants

Sun 4-Oct-09
3:27 pm
Avatar
David B

Enthusiast
Members
Forum Posts: 143
Member Since:
Wed 23-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

When I visited my sister once she made a nettle leaf omelette. It was ok, but not a lot of taste. Could have done with more nettles, perhaps. She's also made nettle soup, but I haven't eaten any of that.

David

Sun 4-Oct-09
4:56 pm
Avatar
KateUK
uk

Councillor
Members
Forum Posts: 1829
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Pick the fresh nettle tips in spring- cook like spinach. Nice, full of good stuff, but a little "hairy' in texture. It's the sort of hedgerow food you eat if you have nothing better at the time, except in Spring when they are worth eating.

Kateuk makes things at http://www.etsy.com/shop/finkstuff and sometimes she does this too http://www54paintings.blogspot.com/ and also this http://finkstuff.weebly.com/

Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 509

Currently Online:
20 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

brightspark: 10485

danast: 10232

Aly: 9421

Sooliz: 7981

Hattie: 6920

Ambersparkle: 6665

JoannaS: 4800

Terrier: 4518

eileen54: 4396

Xahha: 4231

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 9

Members: 15387

Moderators: 2

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 6

Forums: 25

Topics: 2246

Posts: 122520

Newest Members:

GaponovaIcots, JulianceW, ZupativKr, Toransp, IgorIcots, Homerlog

Moderators: Toffeeapple: 16220, AdminTA: 10

Administrators: fn: 321, Danny: 5516


Copyright © 2006-2012 Cottage Smallholder      Our Privacy Policy      Advertise on Cottage Smallholder