The Cottage Smallholder


stumbling self sufficiency in a small space

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
green tomato ketchup
Sat 14-Aug-10
10:35 am
Avatar
Rae Mond
Waalre, NL

Councillor
Members
Forum Posts: 1079
Member Since:
Thu 7-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

as requestermarated

here is the link

Intolerance will not be tolerated.

Sat 14-Aug-10
12:03 pm
Avatar
shelley
Guest
Guests

looks yummy! thx!

Sat 14-Aug-10
3:30 pm
Avatar
mike.
Coventry

Councillor
Members
Forum Posts: 1265
Member Since:
Wed 30-Dec-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I fully expect to end up with a load of unripe tomatoes, like last year. I'll have to give that a go smile

Visit my blog for food, drink, photography and hamsters.

Tue 17-Aug-10
8:58 pm
Avatar
Sparkle

1st Grader
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
Mon 25-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Yesterday I made plum sauce from an old recipe I photocopied years ago. It talks about 'rubbing' through a sieve although I processed it through a blender and it was much easier! So assumed that when it mentioned putting the bottles in boiling water to sterilise I thought it another quaint custom........

I looked at this recipe (looks delish) as we'll probably have a lot of green tomatoes and noticed that it too mentioned putting them in a boiling water bath. Oops have I got it wrong and missed a vital step?? What's with the water bath/canning thing? Does it matter if I don't do it and if it does is it too late to do it now...? Help! 

Tue 17-Aug-10
9:51 pm
Avatar
Rae Mond
Waalre, NL

Councillor
Members
Forum Posts: 1079
Member Since:
Thu 7-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

it's to do with sterilising them I think. I skipped this step also. Not sure what effect it will have :s

Intolerance will not be tolerated.

Tue 17-Aug-10
10:19 pm
Avatar
Sparkle

1st Grader
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
Mon 25-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

We'll have to share information on the result! I feel reassured that I'm not the only one to skip that step - thanks Rae!

Tue 17-Aug-10
10:30 pm
Avatar
danast
Argyll, Scotland

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 10232
Member Since:
Thu 24-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

wave  Now I am a bit concerned that you are not sterilising your jars.  And I quote   " to prevent contamination and lengthen the shelf life of homemade jams, preserves and sauces, it's important to sterilise storage jars or bottles."  If you do not the food can spoil very quickly and you are risking not only wasting your time, but your health too.  Take care!

Old teachers never die, they just lose their class

Wed 18-Aug-10
1:09 pm
Avatar
shelley
Guest
Guests

nope I am certain they are sterilising!

 The recipe talks about after filling the jars, to water bath them.  This lengthens the shelf life of things, like this tomato sauce, that have a reasonable amount of sugar and vinegar in them, but not definitely enough to preserve them long term.  Without this step, the sauces are only guaranteed for around 4 months; wih for around a year or two.

Having said that, I don't bother with this step unless the product has NO sugar/vinegar in (such as passata) and my stuff has always lasted fine.

Wed 18-Aug-10
7:08 pm
Avatar
JoannaS
Latvia

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 4800
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have used the water bath sterilising method for processing from cold ie beans in salt water (just trying it out) but I usually just sterlise bottles by putting some water in them and sticking them in the microwave - which I know is not supposed to be the best way of doing it but haven't had a problem so far. If I have a lot of bottles to sterilise I place them in boiling water but can't see the point of using a water bath if you are adding hot food to a clean bottle.whistle

Thu 19-Aug-10
7:26 am
Avatar
shelley
Guest
Guests

but a water bath is not for sterilising; as I have understood it, it is for lengthening shelf life: not sure how or why!eeek

Thu 19-Aug-10
1:04 pm
Avatar
JoannaS
Latvia

Supreme Being
Members
Forum Posts: 4800
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think it ensures that the air is driven out of the jars. Maybe I am getting confused with pressure cooking themeeek

Thu 19-Aug-10
11:36 pm
Avatar
Sparkle

1st Grader
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
Mon 25-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thank you everyone for giving me the benefit of your wisdom! I'm going to go with the path of least resistance and not bother as Shelley does.

 

The bottles have been sterilised in the oven and filled with the sauce which curiously is practically the same as the spiced plum chutney I've also made. So I'm hoping it will be ok - if not I'll know better for next year!!

Fri 20-Aug-10
10:27 am
Avatar
Rae Mond
Waalre, NL

Councillor
Members
Forum Posts: 1079
Member Since:
Thu 7-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I always sterilise my jars by washing in boiling water then putting in the oven to dry out, and haven't had any problems with things going off yet.

Intolerance will not be tolerated.

Fri 20-Aug-10
11:00 am
Avatar
lilythepink
Sud Vienne, France

Graduate
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 39
Member Since:
Fri 13-Aug-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I'm of the same opinion as shelley, that the water bath is to extend the shelf life of the preserve,.er conserves.  (when I first moved out here and mentioned preserves and preservative to a French aqcuaintance she giggled nervously - seems this is the name for, er, condoms).

The hot water bath mentioned in Rae Mond's link is likely to be electric and have it's own timing process.  Here in the shops at "cropping" time there are always pressure cookers next to the bottling supplies.  The "canning" process can be done in the pressure cooker in small quantities but I haven't whipped up the courage to try yet. 

When comparing English & French recipes and advice with those of the US, blimey, we lot are much more cavalier than the N Americans about sterilising etc.  Maybe it's the fear of litigation which triggers their stricter Health & Safety rules, but if it's good enough for Delia and HFW it's good enough for me whistle 

Fri 20-Aug-10
8:20 pm
Avatar
shelley
Guest
Guests

Have you come across the french idea of inversing the jars to complete the sterilisation process (once filled and lidded they inverse the jars until the contents are cold)  This, I discovered in an article somewhere, is to stop any condensation forming on the lid and dripping into the cooling preserve - however surely it will just happen off the base instead???  Anyway, I decided that it was another step I would ignore, until told to do otherwise by the Dept Véterinaire et Hygiène or H+S in the uk.

Oh the thrill of the naugtiness of it!!surprised

No permission to create posts
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 509

Currently Online:
18 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

brightspark: 10485

danast: 10232

Aly: 9421

Sooliz: 7981

Hattie: 6920

Ambersparkle: 6665

JoannaS: 4800

Terrier: 4518

eileen54: 4396

Xahha: 4231

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 9

Members: 15382

Moderators: 2

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 6

Forums: 25

Topics: 2246

Posts: 122520

Newest Members:

Homerlog, CoreyHinge, Niki1Kevete, vincymol, DaryaLoUp, johnnyPAM

Moderators: Toffeeapple: 16220, AdminTA: 10

Administrators: fn: 321, Danny: 5516


Copyright © 2006-2012 Cottage Smallholder      Our Privacy Policy      Advertise on Cottage Smallholder