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Home preserves
Wed 2-Oct-13
4:04 pm
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Xahha
Suffolk

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OH's is shiny steel and cleans extremely well and does not burn. With a copper one, you will wear the surface down over time as the acid in the fruit takes off the top oxidised layer of copper- but even so they should last for a long time.

When working many years ago I used every day, almost, a small copper pan, like a maslin pan and it was much battered and dented (previous users) and cleaned up beautifully when soaked in hot water.

 Are we having fun yet? I am!

Wed 2-Oct-13
4:54 pm
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Original Redhead
Bulgaria

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Failing is not a fault, refusing to try is

Wed 2-Oct-13
5:57 pm
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mauramac
Kent

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Iris - it cleans beautifully and very very quickly. I just put it in the sink and fill it up with soapy water and do all the jammy washing up in it (I always make a lot of mess when jam making). Funnel, spatula, test saucers. spoons etc etc. By the time I have washed those items the pan is virtually clean and just needs a rinse. It is a heavy stainless steel pan with a pouring lip on one side and has measurements up to 15 pints engraved on inside (and metric measurements as well). It doesn't have a brand name on it but I will try and look up the details online as I'm sure I ordered it from Amazon. The base is thick and very little burns on it - I have had rhubarb get close to it but that was my fault for leaving it unattended! Like anything it will probably burn or stick if you abuse it.

I've never fancied copper pans of any kind but a lovely elderly friend of mine gave me her old preserving pan which is even bigger and made of aluminium which I use for chutney as I can make larger batches in that one.

Personally I wouldn't swap my maslin pan for anything but I guess it's what you get used to.

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow.

Wed 2-Oct-13
7:46 pm
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irist
Cornwall UK

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Thanks, Original Redhead, for your link.  I have looked on Amazon but by the time I add carriage the maslin pan will cost almost the same as the one I can buy locally.  I try to support local shops in a bid to keep them open!  I don't use Amazon enough to subscribe to their Prime prepaid delivery service.

Thu 3-Oct-13
11:46 am
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mauramac
Kent

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I recently bought a new 'gadget' from Amazon

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B003AQH90K/ref=pe_38572.....71_TE_item

as we have boxes of apples we need to process and this remarkable little gizmo has been brilliant at cutting down the prep time.

I used a new service of delivery that Amazon now offer whereby for a reduced postage cost you can collect the item at a shop or outlet close to where you live. I opted for this service and was amazed when the item was actually delivered the next day as promised. It cost me £1.99 and a 3 min trip to local Co-op to collect parcel. I will use this service every time in future as it saves having to wait in for a courier and is much cheaper. Normal postage for this item was £3.99. I use the Co-op (which is in a small row of shops in a village nearby) whenever I can, as like you, I do like to support local shops and if this method of delivery means they get paid as well then everyone wins.

You can track your parcel and then you get an email to tell you your unique code for the box in the store where your parcel is once it has been delivered there. My gadget came all the way from Scotland to Basildon in Essex and was then put on a TNT van and delivered out to shop in the late afternoon - which considering we are a semi rural area was very impressive.

I would thoroughly recommend this service smile

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow.

Thu 3-Oct-13
1:25 pm
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irist
Cornwall UK

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What an excellent idea.  I did not know Amazon had this service.  Not sure where they would deliver here though.  We do have a village shop (Premier) but the nearest towns are 8 and 12 miles away from me so I tend to hold off shopping until I have a long list or a specific item which justifies a car journey.

Thu 3-Oct-13
2:06 pm
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OlgaO
Suffolk

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I have bought a Kitchen Craft maslin pan off Amazon in 2010 and haven't looked back! It ias a 9litre one, has an 'encapsulated base', and does a wonderful job! Just had a look at my Amazon account, this is the same one available nowadays- and with free delivery!
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kitchen-Craft-Maslin-Handl.....maslin+pan

Maura, that peeler is lovely! I had a good old giggle reading the reviews- few characters incensed with being unable to operate it vs those in seventh heaven!!!

Thu 3-Oct-13
7:17 pm
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mauramac
Kent

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I know Olga - I read a few of those as well and nearly didn't bother but I am a hopeless case for a gadget. Anyway it is a bit tricky to work out if you are a bit thick like me (with tools etc) but good old hubby stepped in, tutt tutted a bit and then hey presto he got it working.

Honestly - it was like getting all my birthdays in one go big_laugh I whizzed through a big batch of apples in minutes and kept all the cores and skins for making pectin. Also if you fancy an apple with your brekkie or lunch - 10 seconds it's done. Makes me eat more than I normally would as I get fed up peeling them and I have a dicky digestive system that can't process skins so it's brilliant. I've fallen in love with apples all over again.

Not a huge price to pay for such a great little tool......I'm a happy bunny anyway cool

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow.

Sat 5-Oct-13
8:47 pm
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Terrier
York

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I love my maslin pan, it's a big steel one, it doesn't have the measurements on the side, I wish it did, it's a bit of a pain won making jellies as I have to pour it from the 'drip bowl' into a jug to measure, before pouring into the pan. I tend to stick to quantities between 1 and 2 litres as we don't have mains gas and the electric cooker never seems to get things to a rolling boil over that size.
I occasionally resort to using the gas ring on our barbecue to get the full boil on jams and jellies.

Wed 16-Oct-13
5:49 pm
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Sooliz
Somerset

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Finally got round to making apple & date chutney.....4 jars to add to my growing collection of preserves etc. in the utility room.

Red tomato chutney next. Oh, and still more apples to do something with....these cookers off the tree in our garden definitely don't keep well, I need to process them into something or other sooner rather than later.

learning to love veg…..except celery :-O

Wed 16-Oct-13
7:54 pm
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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Sue, we have a glut of apples! I made some apple butter, and some juice, but nothing will make inroads into the windfalls. I fear the apples we have picked to store won't last well this year, they seem very soft. I have made several batches of Janet's easy peasy red tomato chutney--guess what everyone will get for presents this year! For the last batch I added a bit of cinnamon to the recipe, and liquidized it half way through cooking. It makes very acceptable ketchup. (It wouldn't look good enough to sell without sieving, but is fine for home use.) I did make some ketchup from some recipe or other, but it just tasted like bought ketchup and was a lot more work, so no point!

Thu 17-Oct-13
7:39 am
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Sooliz
Somerset

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Hello Barbara, long time no see wave

I might have a go at apple butter, not made that before. Another use for the apples, thanks. Every time I make a fruit cake now I put a diced apple in, and we had some apple slices pan fried with sausages the other day. Already got several tubs of stewed apples in the freezer, plus a couple of crumbles and a pie.

learning to love veg…..except celery :-O

Thu 17-Oct-13
11:57 am
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brightspark
Wilts

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It's the apple season, alright!! I have just prepared another large saucepanful of apples, and I will freeze most of it (like you, Sue).
We love fruit with our breakfast porridge, but also the family adore apple crumbles, so they are ready in the freezer for that sort of occasion.

Women are like tea bags. . .
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until they're in hot water.
- Eleanor Roosevelt -
Thu 17-Oct-13
5:29 pm
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Sooliz
Somerset

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Making apple butter in the slow cooker....having googled for recipes, I'm amazed at how easy it is and wonder why I haven't done it before! Peeled and cored loads of apples then chopped them up in my food processor, they're simmering nicely with brown sugar, cinnamon and cloves and a glug of Thatchers Katy cider (I shall have to drink the rest of the bottle....oh well whistlebig_laugh). The house smells like Christmas! laugh

learning to love veg…..except celery :-O

Thu 17-Oct-13
5:36 pm
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Toffeeapple
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I haven't had cider in years. I hope your butter is good.

I'll try that again!

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