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How to prevent food from sticking to your BBQ grill
Sat 24-Jul-10
8:44 pm
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Danny
Scarborough, England
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Today, at age 53 and a bit, I discovered that, in N. America, grilling is what you do on a Barbecue.

I know that they refer to what we know as grilling (under a stove grill) as broiling.

Michelle - how about a US/UK dictionary?

Anyhow, this is a good read.

 

Never knowingly underfed

Sun 25-Jul-10
3:56 am
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Michelle from Oregon
Oregon, USA

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That is too funny Danny! big_laugh

A dictionary is a great idea! That is something I struggle with from time to time. Usually, I either look at the rest of the conversation and puzzle through, check online, or if completely stymied, I ask somebody here. And I hope if I say something that puzzles someone, let me know, and I'll try again.

That is a great article you linked to, Steve Raichlen is my BBQ guru. His recipe books are always photographed wonderfully, and his recipes and directions are easy to follow. Definitely worth adding to your collection.sporki_am_hungrychef

 

If you can't be a shining example, be a terrible warning!

Sun 25-Jul-10
10:17 am
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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I sometimes forget that grilling (US) means barbequeing only. I must have lived in the UK too long.  big_laugh

I try to remember to post in both US and UK, but probably forget a lot of the time, almost certainly with the most puzzling terms. sorry  I am always happy to translate. whistle I hope to have a top-up of American English later this year...

One big difference is the meaning of "garden". In the US that refers to the space where you grow produce (veg and fruit). In the UK a garden can have a lawn, flowers, trees, fruit, veg, decking (if you insist!), play equipment...

Yard US = Garden UK

Garden US = Veg plot UK, more or less

Yard UK = small paved area, not to be confused with the Area, a paved area outside the basement/cellar door--can someone define Area more clearly? doh

Sun 25-Jul-10
10:39 am
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Cilantro US = Corriander UK (took me ages to work that one out). I would go on but I think you should have started a different thread Danny and I need to go and top and tail half a bucket of beans.eeek

 

Sun 25-Jul-10
11:00 am
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mike.
Coventry

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I'm not familiar with the term 'Area' to mean anything specific.

Spring Onions (UK) = Scallions (US/Ireland)

Courgettes (UK) = Zucchini (US)

Aubergine (UK) = Eggplant (US)

Milky Way (UK) = Mars Bar (US) [I think that is the right way round but don't get me started on American chocolate, awful stuff with a few exceptions, usually those where there are other flavours or textures to distract you from the chocolate itself]

My main confusion was the Americans use of the word Broil. When I was younger and first encountered it, I didn't know what on earth they were talking about. I had never ever heard anyone use that word  while I was growing up. It's far too similar to Boil, which of course used to be the traditional British way of cooking nearly every vegetable wink

Visit my blog for food, drink, photography and hamsters.

Sun 25-Jul-10
8:57 pm
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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Chickpeas=Garbanzos

Area, the bit outside a basement flat with an outside staircase, enclosed by railings at ground level. Does anyone else use the term? I think of it when I see tall London houses with a basement flat, and the space in front of the subterranean windows enclosed by the stairs is the area.

Sun 25-Jul-10
8:59 pm
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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I think this does need a different thread, or else renaming. It took ages to find it again!

Sun 25-Jul-10
11:38 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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I think that you might find this blog rather informative.









I'll try that again!

Tue 27-Jul-10
12:04 pm
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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Yes, it's fascinating! Thanks!

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