The Cottage Smallholder


stumbling self sufficiency in a small space

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
International Food & Culture
Wed 7-Oct-09
9:27 pm
Avatar
Danny
Scarborough, England
Admin
Forum Posts: 5516
Member Since:
Sat 12-Aug-06
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Good idea by Lovage. This is the place for tips about how other cultures prepare dishes and present courses.

Suitable lnks are especially welcome.

Let's see how it goes.

Never knowingly underfed

Thu 8-Oct-09
5:07 pm
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16220
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I'm looking forward to reading some interesting stuff here.

I'll try that again!

Fri 9-Oct-09
10:46 pm
Avatar
booklegger
Japan

2nd Grader
Members
Forum Posts: 12
Member Since:
Sat 3-Oct-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I thought I had posted in here!?  Maybe I did something wrong.

Here is a link I used when I first moved to Japan, it helped me learn about typical Japanese foods and their preparation:  http://www.nsknet.or.jp/~tomi-yasu/index_e.html

Also, bento box lunches are an everyday here and while many people prepare them from scratch I find they help use up our leftovers and save on lunch expenses.

This past week a neighbor taught me how to make my own miso paste.  It was not as difficult as I had imagined.  It is now fermenting for 3 months or longer before we see how it turns out.  Miso soup is eaten every day for breakfast over here.

Take care,

T

Fri 9-Oct-09
11:02 pm
Avatar
Danny
Scarborough, England
Admin
Forum Posts: 5516
Member Since:
Sat 12-Aug-06
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Ho booklegger - I am impressed by the breakfast menu on that link.

Question: does breakfast include all of those items or just one or two? I am astounded that the Japanese have discovered The Kipper.

Respect!

Never knowingly underfed

Fri 9-Oct-09
11:26 pm
Avatar
booklegger
Japan

2nd Grader
Members
Forum Posts: 12
Member Since:
Sat 3-Oct-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

It includes all of them. My friends in a hurry have a quick cup of miso soup like we grab a slice of toast.  But, most mornings are soup, rice with a raw or barely cooked egg (onsen eggs) or a rolled omelet (which is very sweet and not at all what I had in mind what I heard "omelet") and natto (fermented soybeans, acquired taste that I have not developed).

This is a good representation: Typical Japanese breakfastImage Enlarger

"The Kipper" has been around forever here!

Sat 10-Oct-09
6:21 pm
Avatar
Danny
Scarborough, England
Admin
Forum Posts: 5516
Member Since:
Sat 12-Aug-06
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Now that's what I call A Proper Breakfast – I mean the photo in your link. Mouthwatering. It has raised the bar on my idea of breakfast/brunch as per my own topic in the Starters/Breakfast section.

If you have a spare few minutes, could you please identify all of the dishes in that super photo please? The only one I can recognise with certainty is the rice.

Cancel that request, booklegger. I just realised that when I pass my mouse pointer over the photo, each item is named and described.

Never knowingly underfed

Sat 17-Oct-09
1:34 pm
Avatar
SOL
UK

Knowledegable
Members
Forum Posts: 274
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I am very interested in middle eastern food.  I especially like the types of food that take 10 mins to throw together, then are slow cooked whilst you get on with the day.  Usually with very cheap cuts of meat, and lots of veg. Then you make some quick cous cous and your dinner is served. 

Middle eastern food also has lots of vegetarian foods.  Or should I say vegetable based meals.  Very frugal, and highly tasting.  Yes, I defo like this food.  Will find some links when I can.

But there is one dish that is my signature dish.  I use this one for entertaining close friends, if I know I am going to be busy.  And this dish is Chicken cooked with prunes.  Or some call it passover chicken.  But this is delicious with cous cous, bulgar wheat, or boiled potatoes.  Makes for a very easy dinner with a cold meze starter of houmus, aubergine dip, olives and white bean dip.  Served with home made pittas from the freezer. 

Then desert of fresh fruit and almond pancakes.  Which sounds weird, but it is ground almonds and half and half with flour.  you make then as normal thin crepes.  with rose water and honey.  And then finally turkish coffee you can stand a spoon up in with baklava/baklawa

My mouth is watering thinking about it   

Sat 17-Oct-09
2:03 pm
Avatar
SOL
UK

Knowledegable
Members
Forum Posts: 274
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

this is the closest recipe I could find for chicken and prunes

http://www.inmamaskitchen.com/RECIPES/RECIPES/Jewi.....prune.html

Sat 17-Oct-09
4:58 pm
Avatar
fn
Newmarket
Admin
Forum Posts: 321
Member Since:
Sat 12-Aug-06
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thanks for that. I love middle eastern food.

Sat 17-Oct-09
6:56 pm
Avatar
KateUK
uk

Councillor
Members
Forum Posts: 1829
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I recommend The Legendary Cuisine of Persia by Margarte Shaidaisbn 1-902304-60-8

A mouthwatering read , the recipes are really, really good.

Kateuk makes things at http://www.etsy.com/shop/finkstuff and sometimes she does this too http://www54paintings.blogspot.com/ and also this http://finkstuff.weebly.com/

Sun 18-Oct-09
12:42 am
Avatar
booklegger
Japan

2nd Grader
Members
Forum Posts: 12
Member Since:
Sat 3-Oct-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

S.O.L I think I will try that recipe.  I have prunes I need to use up.  I never really liked Mid East food until I moved to Japan and became friends with a family from Persia. I enjoyed most everything they made.  Now I have a lot of the seasonings and supplies but am lost with what to do with it.  So appreciate the book suggestion as well.

Thu 22-Oct-09
10:16 pm
Avatar
SOL
UK

Knowledegable
Members
Forum Posts: 274
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thanks KateUK, I think I might add that ot my XMAS list.

Go for it bootlegger.  Peeps are freaked out that it can sometimes be slightly sticky.  Add a touch of water and return it to the oven to cook thre water into the sauce.

Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 509

Currently Online:
17 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

brightspark: 10485

danast: 10232

Aly: 9421

Sooliz: 7981

Hattie: 6920

Ambersparkle: 6665

JoannaS: 4800

Terrier: 4518

eileen54: 4396

Xahha: 4231

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 9

Members: 15389

Moderators: 2

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 6

Forums: 25

Topics: 2246

Posts: 122520

Newest Members:

Richardthody, RussellDaw, GaponovaIcots, JulianceW, ZupativKr, Toransp

Moderators: Toffeeapple: 16220, AdminTA: 10

Administrators: fn: 321, Danny: 5516


Copyright © 2006-2012 Cottage Smallholder      Our Privacy Policy      Advertise on Cottage Smallholder