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Lamb
Sat 17-Oct-09
8:40 pm
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JoannaS
Latvia

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I bought a lamb from a local farmer a while back but it turned out to be rather scrawny pathetic beast (pity as the first one we had off him was gorgeous). Demanded a proper one this next time, anyway back to the scrawny one. I have pulled out several bony chop like joints out of the freezer – no I am not very good at labelling stuff either and I was just wondering what to do with them. I had thought of boiling the lot up for a long time to make a stock and use the bits of meat up to add to a stew but any other suggestions would be most welcome.

Sat 17-Oct-09
9:25 pm
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David B

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Wed 23-Sep-09
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Sounds like just the stuff for a traditional Welsh cawl. Yum!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/mid/sites/food/pages/ca.....nnin.shtml

David

Sun 18-Oct-09
7:08 pm
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Danny
Scarborough, England
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Irish Stew is another good medium for scrawny lamb as it typically calls for neck joints. Thinking about it, I have never made a good one for some reason. Thanks for the prompt, Joanna. I think it's something that I should master before St Patrick's Day on 17-Mar.

My mum was a really brilliant cook of the basics. She did a mean I.S. She ran a B&B for many years from the late 70s and it appeared regularly on the menu. On one famous occasion, the family meal (after the guests had dined) was a large serving plate of I.S. placed in the centre of the table and everybody dipped in, The novelty of a shared main dish (as opposed to the normal individual servings) struck a chord for some reason. It never happened before or after but, 30 years later, every one of us five siblings can remember that evening with perfect clarity.

Never knowingly underfed

Sun 18-Oct-09
7:37 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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David B said:

Sounds like just the stuff for a traditional Welsh cawl. Yum!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/mid/sites/food/pages/ca.....nnin.shtml

David


My Mum used scrag end of neck, it was all she could afford and she'd have it on the hob for a day and a night, just simmering.  Veg was added without being fried and if I was lucky she'd add red lentils and suet dumplings.  If I was unlucky she'd add Pearl Barley.  I can't make it taste the way she did it at all!

I'll try that again!

Tue 20-Oct-09
4:31 pm
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Well we nearly made it to the Welsh cawl but unfortunately we didn't get around to digging up some leeks and some friends called round but the rest of it was fine. Just added some of Fiona's dried celery she sent and I think that made a difference

Tue 20-Oct-09
5:04 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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I'm sure the celery gave it a better flavour than leeks would have.  I never saw my Mum using leeks, ever and I've no idea why that should be.

I'll try that again!

Tue 20-Oct-09
6:31 pm
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fn
Newmarket
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Hi Joanna

Great to hear that the dried celery is coming in handy 🙂

I agree  with Toffeeapple I think that leeks might have not been such a good idea.

Wed 21-Oct-09
7:51 pm
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Aww that's a shame, I like leeks

Wed 21-Oct-09
7:56 pm
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mutley
Didcot/uk

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JoannaS said:Aww that's a shame, I like leeks


Leeks in a cream sauce .. droool

Thu 22-Oct-09
9:33 am
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shelley
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our family love leeks too but the ones we grew this year in our veg plot were soooo strong they were effectively inedible; any ideas??

Fri 23-Oct-09
6:43 pm
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JoannaS
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As Mutley put Leeks in cream sauce, I just use a tub of cream cheese. I put the recipe up elsewhere really easy.

Wed 25-Nov-09
7:15 am
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Thought you might be interested in this article about lamb, or rather mutton and how to cook it.

http://digitalutility.co.uk/cfrf/Importance_of_Upl.....Mutton.pdf

Wed 25-Nov-09
10:53 am
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fn
Newmarket
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Thanks Joanna that mutton pudding looks delicious.

Wed 25-Nov-09
11:21 am
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Suky
Godalming, Surrey

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My local butcher sells mutton but it can be dearer than lamb!  It does taste much richer than lamb and I keep asking Sainsburys to consider selling it but no luck so far.

Wed 25-Nov-09
7:41 pm
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Well buy some mutton for the sake of the sheep farmers, they have it tough at the moment. Once they used to get good money for the wool, now they are lucky if they can pay the shearers and yet most of our countryside in the hills is kept that way because the sheep eat the grass, with no sheep we would have a vastly different scenery - well if we could see it for the trees.

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