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cleaning the glass on wood burners
Thu 30-Dec-10
9:08 pm
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Neil
Dalgarven Ayrshire

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We have a Morso wood/coal burner, cloth with Fairy Liquid, well Aldi's brand, works for us.

 

Anyone have a small village with a carpenter / joiner there?  A friend I used to shoot with has a joiner 2 doors down, it was costing him to dump the wood scraps and old window frames.

 

Ended up I went once a week in the last 2 months amd must have had a couple of tons of wood from him, and free! Found out he liked American beers, so he got a christmas prezzie from us. pintpintpint

 

The only drawback is the large amount of nails I have to fish out, a strong magnet does the trick. 😀

Sat 8-Jan-11
2:57 pm
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Danny
Scarborough, England
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Neil said:

 

Anyone have a small village with a carpenter / joiner there?  A friend I used to shoot with has a joiner 2 doors down, it was costing him to dump the wood scraps and old window frames.


 

That reminds me, Neil.
Small local builders are also a great source for old lumber and window frames. We had a two loads delivered for us a couple of years ago. Only problem was the effort to saw them up. I think we will do it again in the summer in preparation for another possibly cold winter. Our local log supplier is reasonably priced at £3 a bag but we were using seven a week at the coldest point.

Never knowingly underfed

Sat 8-Jan-11
3:20 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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eeek That's a lot of money going up the chimney Danny.

I'll try that again!

Tue 11-Jan-11
6:24 pm
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EmmaDThomas
Algarve, Portugal

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Tue 11-Jan-11
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My partner uses really cheap toothpaste! Then wipes with a damp sponge and dries with rag 🙂

http://www.emmathomas.ws

Keep up to date with my adventures on my blog! :-)

Tue 11-Jan-11
10:27 pm
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Terrier
York

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That's worth a try Emma, but I suppose it's abrasive too - given up on the ash & newspaper as it definitely scratches. So far the best bet seems to be keeeping an old rag near the stove and while it's on if we notice heavy deposits on the glass, open the door and give it a wipe, comes straight off while hot.

Wed 16-Mar-11
7:11 pm
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Cherami
Cher France

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First things first i am not so sure there is an old method, because I don't think they had glass doors as they would not have been able to produce the special glass. I should think it is a late Edwardian idea glass. Now I clean my plastic goggles with Brasso as this is very slightly abrasive and of course silvo is even less abrasive. No one has mention vinegar that's is a good cleaner for glass

Our children reap what we sow

Wed 16-Mar-11
7:31 pm
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Only just found this thread since it started while I was away in Oz. We use a cream cleanser but one tip from hubby's father was to jam foil in front of the window while lighting as that is the worse time for the glass to get mucky.

Neil You have a Morso, they are wonderful. We had one of those in Denmark and it was great, really heated our living room up well and it was a large room with a patio window at the end, but not only that it was sufficient for our bedroom and the kitchen too as it circulated nicely. Saved a lot of oil which was used for our central heating.

We do have a joiner in our village, he made our kitchens in both our apartments but he uses the wood himself. We do have a friend who prepares firewood for sale and he had a huge pile of stuff he couldn't put in pallets so we helped him out on that cheers

Wed 16-Mar-11
8:23 pm
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ep
Bulgaria

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I would still go with my stainless steel cleaner...just when it's warm and then with a damp cloth..works for me....

Who lives long sees much : The diary of my life in Bulgaria

Wed 16-Mar-11
8:26 pm
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Danny
Scarborough, England
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JoannaS said:

Neil You have a Morso, they are wonderful. We had one of those in Denmark and it was great, really heated our living room up well and it was a large room with a patio window at the end, but not only that it was sufficient for our bedroom and the kitchen too as it circulated nicely. Saved a lot of oil which was used for our central heating.

 


 

Joanna, I had never heard of Morso but I found the UK importer's' site and an optional extra fan that circulates heat from the stove throughout the room.

The fact that it does not require any power source really sparked my interest, despite its expensive price tag.

Did you guys have a fan in Denmark?

Are they really good stoves?

Never knowingly underfed

Thu 17-Mar-11
6:42 pm
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JoannaS
Latvia

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We didn't have the fan but ours did have side panels that were supposed to distribute the heat better through convection. I think it was this one. We have a Norwegian woodstove this time and although it is not as expensive it is not as good either. It is fine for what we need but I think it feels draughtier than our Mørso did. cheers We didn't have a huge range to choose from and there is no way I would get a Chinese one, they are really flimsy and you can tell just from the handles.

Thu 17-Mar-11
8:00 pm
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MOS
Cannock Chase

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we use these fans alot in narrowboats they are good and as you say dont need an outside power source ,but make sure you get the right one they come in different heat ranges and burn out quickly if you get the wrong one MOS,

sit down with a cupa and the urge will subside

Thu 17-Mar-11
10:27 pm
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Terrier
York

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Never heard of these fans, but just been reading the link, this was our first winter with the log burner and it did us nicely, we spent most 'indoor' time sat in the kitchen around it, but didn't need to huddle round it, it seems to disperse heat quite well on it's own. We got a Stanford.

Tue 31-May-11
9:44 am
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Noncitydweller
Lincolnshire

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 This site has a stove which has a 2 or 4 pipes coming out of it which sucks (fan) hot air to different parts of the house. Now I can™t see how you would be able to do that unless you lived in a bungalow. Also I made sure my stove fitter left a hole in the wall as the fire that was in the fireplace (LPG) before I replaced it with a wood burner had a back boiler and the pipes went in to the airing cupboard which was to the side of the fireplace which is in the kitchen. Although I never got round to it I was going to have a fan suck the air through the airing cupboard into the kitchen especially when I was getting to hot in the sitting room. Worth a thought even if a vent is all you can do??

http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/wood_burning_stoves/.....tanks.html

Modern wood burners should not need to have the glass cleaned or at least my Scan doesn't. If you close it down the glass goes brown but as you open it up again it cleans itself within about an hour. This is due to a secondary burn which sends hot gases or air down the glass. The secondary burn also increase efficiency. Worth considering a new on rather than an old second hand if the price difference is it to big??

Tue 31-May-11
10:22 pm
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Terrier
York

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sorry, but mine definitely needed cleaning...might be because we had used damp wood maybe...from what I've read, maybe this winter will be better as we've already got wood drying and being stored. Last year was all a bit last minute.

Mon 15-Aug-11
6:51 pm
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kat
south staffs
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We use oven cleaner or the stuff we bring back from France.

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