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How do I keep the Home Fires burning??
Tue 30-Aug-11
10:08 pm
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cocoagirl
Birmingham

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Tue 30-Aug-11
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Hello everyone - I've just joined the site and apart from wanting to know how to build a composter from pallets (I've posted query on the Pallet forum), I could do with some tips on keeping my gorgeous wood burning stove going all evening

We started with newspaper, kindling and a couple of very dry, seasoned logs and it was fantatic.  But... 5 mins in and the flames had gone out and the fire was dead as the proverbial dodo.   Not sure which air vents to open, close etc. there seem to be some at the top and the bottom.  When it does start burning, it really roars and we're trying to get that gentle burn found in lovely old pubs in winter!

Any tips anyone please?   We have lot of good logs to burn, but any good tips on where to find cheap kindling?  Happy to scour woods during our weekend walks but methinks we will soon run short and I don't want to buy from the petrol station at some ridiculous price

Finally - should I resort to firelighters??

Sure my 90 year old mum would be ashamed that I can't keep the fire going - daren't ask her for advice!

Tue 30-Aug-11
10:20 pm
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Terrier
York

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Tue 22-Sep-09
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Sue

do you know what make of stove the woodburner is?

we got one installed last year and struggled to begin with, but are doing fine now, it sounds to me like you've got the air volume controls set to full and you need to adjust them. They  need to be full to start with and once it's burning turned down, otherwise everything just burns up in no time.

Wed 31-Aug-11
1:01 pm
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cocoagirl
Birmingham

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Ah thanks, yes we left the 'holes' open at the top and bottom and were impressed with our cleverness at seeing the roaring fire!  But not for long, so I'll have another go tonight - going to Google too as not sure what difference the top and bottom ones make (no makers name on the burner)

Loving the countrylife though!!

Wed 31-Aug-11
3:52 pm
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MOS
Cannock Chase

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Wed 12-May-10
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Hi Sue

welcome to the site

depending on the position of the knobs on your fire they will do variouse jobs if you have knobs on the main body of the stove they are inlets ,if they are on the chimney or in the pipe they are outlet restrictors as a general rule open the outlets and the botom inlets to get the air into the kindlin to fan the fire for starting then gradualy shut the botom vents to stop the fire burning away too fast ,once the hearth is hot and you have a good ember base keep the botom vents allmost closed and slowly open the upper inlet vents ,this reburns the gasses that are rising from the base of the fire (thats where the flames come from over the burn area )this will olso burn the glass clean as it creates heat higher up in the stove .the outlet in the chimney is used to make a long slow burn with the other vents almost closed (for overnight burning )if any smoke escspes from the fire when you have this closed there is too much air getting in and not enough getting out (no draw )hope this helps MOS

 

if you have a back boiler things get realy interesting knob wise ,but you will get the hang of it EVENTUALYbig_laughbig_laughbig_laughkiss

sit down with a cupa and the urge will subside

Wed 14-Sep-11
10:28 am
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Glen
Northumberland

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It really is just trial and error until you get used to your stove. Since different houses will have different draughts (or none) and so on, every stove, even if the same model, behaves a little differently and then different again when you burn different sorts of wood.

 

BUT, it is worth the effort as there is nothing nicer than a wood stove in winter is there? smile

 

Just a thought, if your room is too draught proof you might have to let a little air in - (I have to do that in our spare room which has an open fire, to get the fire going in the first place)     

 

Meus terra erro est frigus

Wed 14-Sep-11
7:10 pm
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veronica
France

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Wed 23-Sep-09
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How dry the wood is makes a big difference. If you have good dry wood, you should be able to shut the air intakes almost completely, once you've got it burning well, and it will simmer away quietly. Ours is a Godin -- it has two vents at the front that you only really need to open when you've just lit the fire or your wood is really green. Then it has a lever at the back for fine adjustment once you've closed the front vents (which you should be able to do 10-15 minutes after lighting it). Maybe your top and bottom ones do something similar. You could post a photo -- someone might recognise it!

Sun 18-Sep-11
8:06 am
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Danny
Scarborough, England
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Our woodburner is a Federal Airtight " must be over 30 years old, I guess. I googled it just now and come across this site wood-stove.org

It does work well and is reasonable with its appetite for wood.

Sue, finding the wood is the tricky bit for us too. we envy Glen and his endless supply. If he lived a bit nearer we would barter, maybe fruit liqueuer or sumfink sloe_gin

We get our firewood from a bloke in the village who works as a lineman for BT. He picks up loads in the course of his daily work, chops it to size and sells it at £3 for a decent sized bag. I guess we burn three bags a week in winter.

We do pick up kindling out and about, as you do, but I think most of us have to pay for our firewood.

Never knowingly underfed

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