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Self Sufficient Gardening
Fri 5-Mar-10
9:48 am
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Now totally confused but the bergamot given to me the other night in syrup was definatly a citrus fruit and it tastes like the flavouring in Earl Grey tea. Whistle

Fri 5-Mar-10
9:58 am
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KateUK
uk

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They are both called "bergamot", but the herb has that as its 'common' name in the UK, not it's botanical name, which is monarda didyma. The Bergamot citrus has the same smell and taste as the herb, that's why the herb came to be commonly named Bergamot- the cheapo home-grown in your cottage garden alternative for the expensive imported must-have citrus fruit the wealthy classes could afford to buy.

In America, where it originates, the common name for Monarda is 'Oswego Tea' after the place it originates and it's useage. In the UK it is 'Bergamot' as we used it as a cheap alternative source of the Bergamot Citrus smell we loved.

Kateuk makes things at http://www.etsy.com/shop/finkstuff and sometimes she does this too http://www54paintings.blogspot.com/ and also this http://finkstuff.weebly.com/

Fri 5-Mar-10
10:02 am
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danast
Argyll, Scotland

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JoannaS said:Now totally confused but the bergamot given to me the other night in syrup was definatly a citrus fruit and it tastes like the flavouring in Earl Grey tea. Whistle


Hi Joanna - good to see you back,  we have missed you,  How was Cyprus?  (or are you still there)   I see the minute you are back you are confused.   That is what this forum does to you!!!!!       Big_Laugh    Big_Laugh    Big_Laugh

Old teachers never die, they just lose their class

Fri 5-Mar-10
10:05 am
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Still here in Cyprus but it is our last day. A little cold to be outside so I'm on the internet trryyyyyyinng to catch up Doh

Fri 5-Mar-10
10:05 am
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KateUK
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I meant to ask- was it gorgeously aromatic?

17th/18th century ladies would fight you for a taste of real bergamot preserve...Smile

Kateuk makes things at http://www.etsy.com/shop/finkstuff and sometimes she does this too http://www54paintings.blogspot.com/ and also this http://finkstuff.weebly.com/

Fri 5-Mar-10
10:10 am
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JoannaS
Latvia

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It was lovely, I have to say! Then again I have had gorgeous food all week, fresh salads and tasty meat. Perfect after a snowy winter! I think I have finally shaken off my colds.Magic

Fri 5-Mar-10
10:33 am
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KateUK
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Excellent!Big_Hug Must be nice to besomewhere a little more Spring-like after all that snow and ice. I went for a short walk around yesterday to look at snowdrops, feel so much better for getting outside- sore feet today, but worth it!

Kateuk makes things at http://www.etsy.com/shop/finkstuff and sometimes she does this too http://www54paintings.blogspot.com/ and also this http://finkstuff.weebly.com/

Sun 7-Mar-10
9:31 am
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Back to snow shoes today I think, there was more snow while we were away Doh

Sun 7-Mar-10
10:25 am
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KateUK
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We're still getting very heavy frosts and a wind that cuts right through you- sheltered gardening only! Loads fo cutting back to do as all the clematis are shooting like crazy ( have they not felt the cold wind?) but it's not much fun out there, despite the sunshine.

Kateuk makes things at http://www.etsy.com/shop/finkstuff and sometimes she does this too http://www54paintings.blogspot.com/ and also this http://finkstuff.weebly.com/

Sun 7-Mar-10
11:04 am
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Danny
Scarborough, England
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We had a hard frost last night. Thankfully, Fiona's Eltex paraffin heater has kept the greenhouse safe these past months. In the house, the heating was on all night. It has an automatic override when it's cold to help prevent burst pipes.

My list of new gardening terms (me = non gardener) has been growing lately. Pricking out, potting on, damping off. Our kitchen sink area doubles as a potting table some evenings. The amount of mud is incredible! Fiona is like a kid when it comes to mud Smile. But our windowsills are now filled with serried ranks of teeny seedlings in their baby pots. Some with plastic bags over to act as mini cloches. It really is invigorating to see so much life sprouting up. The tomatoes are not faring well, sadly. She think maybe she started too early for them but more are on the way.

She is also spending one hour a day redesigning the herbaceous borders and enlarging them to make space for the flowers she hopes to sell on the gateside stand.

Never knowingly underfed

Mon 14-Jun-10
7:34 am
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craftsmaster
Gold Coast

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Hi SOL,

Thanks for posting. I hope you'll enjoy the entire community.

Well, I must say that it's not advisable to start with what you are planning. Start with a few herbs and add as you go along. With 5 herbs, I now have aroun 20 herbs in my 400 sq.m gardens.

Grows them from seed and start planting during winter..just keep in mind, start with a little and grows them healthy.

Cheers,

Carmel

Mon 14-Jun-10
8:50 am
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Welcome craftsmaster.

I have been busy expanding my herbs. I was amazed that 5 out of 12 lavender plants survived the winter we had here in Latvia but the thyme didn't. The thyme nearly did and then I think I removed the covering too early when it was too tender (well I think that is what happened,) I will have to try the thyme again. Good news is that the marjoram is quite happy here, it dies back and then rejuvenates beautifully so now I have about 5 metres of rows of the stuff, the sage has also come back, it struggled at first but then recovered and that has now been split and divided.  Pineapple weed has seeded itself, as has some chamomile so I am happy about that. Parsley works well here but forgot to plant some this year, the same as dill but some self-seeded into my garden Cheers. I shall start dividing up my mint and lemon balm when I work out where to expand it to. So bit by bit I am increasing the number of herbs I grow.Ok

Wed 23-Jun-10
7:01 am
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craftsmaster
Gold Coast

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G'day Joanna,

Do you grows thyme and sage from seed? Just wondering why you had such experience, does it due to weather condition?

Carmel

Wed 23-Jun-10
11:37 am
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JoannaS
Latvia

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I did grow thyme and sage from seed but the -29C temperature was perhaps too much over winter. Last year we had low temperatures too but more snow cover earlier and I think that helps. Cheers

Mon 28-Jun-10
3:00 am
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craftsmaster
Gold Coast

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I even know one
person who brews her thyme to make tea. 
She just adds a bit of rosemary and a sprig of mint to go with it! I normally plant thyme in mid-spring, make
shallow rows for the seeds and plant them about one foot apart.  When the thyme seedlings are established,
thin them out to about six inches from each other. 

________________

Carmel Santos
CEO of Herb Gardening Guide
The Australian Guide to Herb Gardening

 

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