The Cottage Smallholder


stumbling self sufficiency in a small space

How to avoid making a soggy bottomed quiche

quiche dish waiting for a quicheI was given a really good tip today from a quiche maker. She sells quiches to her local deli.
“Do you know how to avoid soggy pastry?”
No, I didn’t. I never make quiche as D is not a fan. I love it and occasionally buy one for a girly lunch. Mysteriously Danny always vanishes with the remains.

“Well there is no need to bake the pastry blind (pre-bake). All I do is make my pastry and line the buttered dish. Using a fork, prick the base in several places. Then brush the pastry with beaten egg. Let this harden until it is just tacky. Then add the filling and bake the quiche.”

She claims that the pastry at the base of the quiche is never soggy. I can’t wait to try this and suspect that D might be tempted by a small slice in his lunch box.


  Leave a reply

11 Comments

  1. I remember reading that somewhere awhile back. Thanks for remindng me! Those bleeding hearts are so pretty. I had some years ago but they drowned along with a lot of other perennials before I knew better that planting in wet spots was a no no!
    Hope yoy`re having a lovely weekend :)

    tea
    xo

  2. Rosemary

    I have had no success with dicentra plants either,will water more often.With this very dry spring I have found myself watering everything !!Which goes against my normal action which is to only water newly planted items,also the water butts are now empty,please let it rain.

  3. Fiona Nevile

    Hi Tea,

    I struggled with the right plants in the wrong place for years. Now I try and put them where they will be happy but still have disasters. I didn’t know that there were so many different types of Dicentra until I looked them up on the web.

    We are having a great Bank Holiday weekend.

    Hi Rosemary,

    I’ve been watering everything too. It is finally raining here. Very light rain but constant. Hopefully it will reach you soon! I never thought I would be pleased to have rain on a Bank Holiday but was overjoyed when I heard the patter of rain on the roof when I woke this morning. Our bedroom is close to the eaves.

    Thanks for dropping by.

  4. Rosemary

    Hooray!! it rained most of the day after I posted my comment so it must have brought me luck.Looks like rain again today so fingers crossed we will get some more.

  5. Fiona Nevile

    We got a good dose of rain, Rosemary, at the end of the day. Onto ground soften by the light, misty rain from the past two days. I do hope that you got it too.

  6. Hi, I was just looking for tips on pastry and also if you had come across a ‘pastry pricker’. This is a handy tool for pricking pastry, instead of using a fork. It is like a spiky hair curler fitted onto a roller! I asked Lakeland but they don’t do them – yet. We make crispbread and you have to prick them all over before you bake them, ok when there’s a handy husband around, tedious when there isn’t!
    I would love to know if anyone has come across such a tool.
    Great tip re brushing the flan case with egg ;)

  7. Fiona Nevile

    Hi Mildred,

    I haven’t come across a pastry pricker except a human shaped version welding a fork called Danny.

  8. Riihele ***

    Hei there

    Thank you ever so much for the tip in how to avoid soggy bottomed quiches!! YAY. Take good care and do keep cooking. Rii :)

  9. Fiona Nevile

    Hi Riihele***

    It works, if you have the patience to wait until the egg dries. And the pastry case doesn’t lose its shape (this often happens to me if I pre bake).

    Thanks for leaving a comment.

  10. Pastry cases:-Soggy bottoms! LOL No, this will not do, we don’t want soggy bottoms.
    Brushing with egg wash/beaten egg/egg white, left to dry on the pastry base will make a ‘seal’ between the pastry the filling, this applies to sweet or savoury fillings.
    When making PIE CRUSTS however, always remember to egg wash the tops first then prick the top to allow the steam to escape, otherwise the egg will seal the holes that you’ve just made.
    Also, I always bake pies, flans on a preheated oven baking tray (black is best as this absorbs the heat from the oven) this starts cooking the bottom of the pastry as soon as it’s placed into the oven, avoiding ‘soggy bottoms’!
    LV Odelle.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

519,082 Spambots Blocked by Simple Comments

HTML tags are not allowed.


Copyright © 2006-2012 Cottage Smallholder      Our Privacy Policy      Advertise on Cottage Smallholder


FD