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Bread Making
Mon 24-Jun-13
9:01 am
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irist
Cornwall UK

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Thanks for all your replies.  I'm going to keep trying different recipes until we will find the one we prefer.  Good excuse to eat cake because I can't bear to buy in ingredients which then get pushed to the back of the cupboard!  Waste not, want not.

Wed 10-Jul-13
3:08 pm
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mike.
Coventry

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This morning I had a go at making lardy cake, following the recipe in the river cottage bread book. I don't think I had the fruit distributed properly because a lot fell out when I cut a slice but I think it's come out well for a first attempt. If I do it again, I might use slightly less fruit and sugar because I also found it a bit too sweet for my liking (even though it was only 50g of sugar to 250g of flour, the sugar is sprinkled between layers instead of being mixed into the dough).

Visit my blog for food, drink, photography and hamsters.

Wed 10-Jul-13
5:03 pm
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Sooliz
Somerset

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Oooh, haven't had lardy cake for years!

This afternoon I was putting some sausages in the oven for a pasta bake we're having tomorrow, so decided to make another cake as well.  I decided on a variation of one of Saint Delia's recipes that I've made lots of times - blueberry & pecan muffin cake - I used Greek yogurt instead of milk as it had just gone past its sell by date and needed using up as it still tasted fine.  Instead of blueberries (haven't got any and the ones in the garden aren't ripe yet) I used chopped dried apricots, the last small handful of pecan nuts and the remaining third of a bar of dark chocolate, bashed into bits.

Just had a small piece (for testing purposes wink) and bloody handsome it is too (or gurt lush as they say down here in Somerset big_laugh).

learning to love veg…..except celery :-O

Wed 10-Jul-13
6:05 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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I think you have been enjoying yourself in your kitchen m'dear.  Wasn't it too hot for cooking?

I'll try that again!

Wed 10-Jul-13
6:12 pm
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Sooliz
Somerset

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It was a bit on the warm side, yes…..had the windows and utility room door open (and then had to keep shooing shoo_flyflies out).

Oh, and did you notice?  I put a link in all by myself (well, after re-reading Danny's instructions whistle)laughlaugh

learning to love veg…..except celery :-O

Wed 10-Jul-13
6:21 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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I did notice, very well done!  It isn't so tricky is it, once you've done it a few times it will seem like second nature.  I didn't click your link as I hardly ever make cake but I shall now, just to justify your efforts!

I'll try that again!

Thu 14-Nov-13
11:39 pm
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eileen54
Somerset

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I made this malted multigrain bread today and was quite pleased with the results

1 cup of warm water

1 1/2 teaspoons of dried yeast

2 teaspoons of sugar

1 cup of white bread flour

1 cup of plain flour

1 cup of malted grain flour    mine was from waitrose

1 teaspoon of salt

1/4 cup of vegetable oil

 

put water , sugar and yeast in a jug give it a whisk and leave to froth up.

put flours, salt and oil in the bowl of a mixer.

when the yeast has frothed whisk again pour into flour and place bowl on mixer with a dough hook.

mix until a dough forms if it is too stiff add a tiny bit more water. continue to mix for a couple of minutes until you have a smooth dough. Leave to rise for 1 hour.

Knock dough back and place in a loaf tin, leave to rise again.

place in a cold oven and bake for 40 minutes at 200 deg C.

Cool before slicing.

I should point out that I am a lazy cook and I never sift my flours, I read once that during the war and before that the flours were quite heavy and needed sifting but modern flours did not.

 

Never give up Tomorrow is another day.

Sun 15-Dec-13
1:52 pm
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paperman
Saxmundham, Suffolk

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Eileen, thanks for the recipe, it is very similar to one that I use too. Except I do not use plain flour. The standard bread flour I use also comes from Waitrose (Canadian Very Strong). Like you also I never sift the flour, quite honestly I never even thought about it. I note your comment about being a lazy cook, in which case can I also recommend using a bread machine either for the complete loaf or to make the dough - takes away a lot of mess and effort. I started with a cheap one for under £30.00 which I bought in a sale at Sainsburys but had to replace it about a year ago and had to spend serious money, well £45.00 anyway!! wouldn't want to go back to mixing and mashing by hand. Oh and also the bread machine is a good jam maker too...

I have reached an age where my train of thought often leaves the station without me...

Sun 15-Dec-13
2:06 pm
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paperman
Saxmundham, Suffolk

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Oh and something else. Once the dough is made and gone through it's first rise I will take some of it and put it through my pasta machine to make a sort of flatish, crisp bread. After putting it through the pasta machine I let is rise, then onto an oven sheet and into the oven at 200 degrees, watching carefully - don't ask about timing and don't look away because one minute it is great, the next it has gone too far. But it is an attractive snappy thing that I break into lengths and serve with pâté or maybe cheese board.....

I have reached an age where my train of thought often leaves the station without me...

Sun 15-Dec-13
2:13 pm
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Sooliz
Somerset

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Well, hello there Chris, long looooonnnnnnnnnggg time no see! waveAre you keeping well?

I don't sift flours either.....just give them a quick stir with a whisk to break up any lumps or mix in baking powder etc. 

Thanks for the tip about the flatbread snappy thing (good description lol)......I don't have a pasta machine so a rolling pin and elbow grease will have to suffice whistle

learning to love veg…..except celery :-O

Sun 15-Dec-13
2:27 pm
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paperman
Saxmundham, Suffolk

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Hi Soo, yes fine thanks. Retirement is hard work.....had more time when I had a day job.....not complaining just a comment......if you want to see my latest efforts have a look at http://saxmundhamnews.org/ 

Regarding the flatbreads, I often roll in some cracked peppercorns or other seeds to liven it up a bit.

I only use the pasta machine because I have it, a long rolling pin would be just as good. The strips should be maybe 2 inches wide but not with a straight edge and as long as the width of your oven/oven sheet will allow hope you try it.

I have reached an age where my train of thought often leaves the station without me...

Sun 15-Dec-13
6:03 pm
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eileen54
Somerset

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Hi Chris , I had a very expensive bread maker cost about £90 , I hated it, would not have another one, I did not like the quick breads it made , the hole in the middle and the normal progams took to long. Like the crispbread idea , will have to try it I have only ever used my pasta machine to make pasta

Never give up Tomorrow is another day.

Sun 15-Dec-13
6:38 pm
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paperman
Saxmundham, Suffolk

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I have never tried any of the 'quick breads' so cannot pass any comment except that the word 'quick' and I do not usually appear anywhere near each other.....

The time it takes is never a problem since even if I make bread by hand I will probably take several hours by the time I have let the dough prove and rise etc..

I know some people do object to the little hole in the middle where the paddle does its thing but that only becomes an issue if I let the machine go the whole program and make the finished loaf. It doesn't worry me too much anyway and I have a little hook that I use to extract the paddle and the hole is minimal - that hole is the non-fattening centre of the loaf....!

Best of luck with the crisp breads, I got the idea from a restaurant we go to down the road in Woodbridge where I quizzed the guy as to how he made his rough and rustic looking crisp breads. 

I have reached an age where my train of thought often leaves the station without me...

Sun 15-Dec-13
11:52 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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Ooh, there you are again!  Good to see you.  Yesterday I did the 'dough' thing in my breadmaker because the two other times I had used it, I could not get the loaf out of the pan and after prolonged probing with the silicone spatula, the paddle thing was still baked in.  But yesterday, I got the dough out and punched it back then shaped it to go into my loaf pan, then the airing cupboard thing, and after 30 mins in the oven, I have an acceptable loaf.  In shape, that is - I have to work on the sugar thing (two Tbls?)  not next time.

I'll try that again!

Mon 16-Dec-13
10:26 am
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brightspark
Wilts

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Cooey, Chris, good to see you again!  ok

Don't stay away for so long next time .....smile

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