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Websites for recipes
Mon 6-Sep-10
6:54 pm
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Suz
Los Angeles, California

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Ahh welll....now...where do I start...? The whole GB-USA conversion business gets finnicky with dairy stuff.....let me explain if I may...

The fat content should go something like this......

Skimmed milk  (GB & USA)    <0.5%
Buttermilk   (GB & USA)              1%
Semi-skimmed   (GB & USA)       2%
whole milk   (GB & USA)              4%

Half & half  (USA)     11%
Single cream (GB) >18%
 
Whipping cream (GB)              >35%
Whipping cream  (USA light)      31%
Whipping cream  (USA heavy)   37%

Creme fraiche (GB & USA)     30%
Cream cheese  (GB & USA)    35%

Double cream (GB)         >48%  
Clotted cream (GB)         >55%
Butter (GB & USA)        80-99%

 

The USA doesn't seem to have anything in the say 40-75% range. monster  I can get imported clotted cream for $$$$. However I can't even find imported double cream monstermonster  And have you noticed how many traditional dessert recipes (Delia esp.) involve double cream??????

 

Would a creme fraiche or cream cheese work as a substitute in recipes????  What about mascarpone?  I have found wide ranging estimates on the fat content of mascarpone (40%, 47%, 50% and even 70%)......

 

Oh lord, maths is 12 plus 12, have run out of fingers and toes.....laugh

Life is uncertain ………… eat dessert first!

Mon 6-Sep-10
7:38 pm
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Toffeeapple
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I'm pretty certain that Delia has said to use crème fraiche or marscapone instead of double cream in the past.  Just find something that you like and sweeten it slightly if necessary.

I'll try that again!

Mon 6-Sep-10
7:46 pm
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brightspark
Wilts

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Just make sure that it isn't 'Light' or 'Reduced fat' - because when cooking with it, anything other than full-fat will separate. That's not what you would want !!!

Good Luck

brightsparklystuff

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Mon 6-Sep-10
9:43 pm
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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Have you seen the joyof baking.com Ingredient Substitution site? Sorry not to put in the link, far too tired to work out how. sorry

It isn't infallible, but useful. And it includes one of my favorite substitutions so I can use US recipes that call for unsweetened chocolate--3T (tablespoons) cocoa powder and 1T unsalted butter.

 

 

Mon 6-Sep-10
10:32 pm
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brightspark
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Brilliant, Barbara - just had a look:

That is going to be useful anyway !  ok
Thanks!
brightsparklystuff
Women are like tea bags. . .
you never know how strong they are
until they're in hot water.
- Eleanor Roosevelt -
Tue 7-Sep-10
3:48 am
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Suz
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Thanks for the advice TA, BS and DG. You're the best. I think I'll try to get some mascarpone and see how that goes. *crosses fingers*

 

I think that website could be very useful smile

 

  ......and now DG has even gotten this thread back on topic!

Life is uncertain ………… eat dessert first!

Tue 7-Sep-10
3:07 pm
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Michelle from Oregon
Oregon, USA

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Oh wow Suz, I would have guessed in LA that you would have had no problems finding stuff, you would have figured it would be a foodie paradise. That stinks.

Its very tricky giving advise on something I have never tasted/seen before, embarassed but I have seen recipes for clotted cream before, like this one-

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/sauce/clotted-cream-recipe.html

In the recipe the author even admits its about as close as you can come with the milk available in the US.

 

If you can't be a shining example, be a terrible warning!

Tue 7-Sep-10
3:25 pm
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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Michelle from Oregon said:

Oh wow Suz, I would have guessed in LA that you would have had no problems finding stuff, you would have figured it would be a foodie paradise. That stinks.

Its very tricky giving advise on something I have never tasted/seen before, embarassed but I have seen recipes for clotted cream before, like this one-

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/sauce/clotted-cream-recipe.html

In the recipe the author even admits its about as close as you can come with the milk available in the US.


That is fairly close to the original, I think, Michelle. It was made
in very wide shallow pans (think, 18 inches wide, a few inches deep) on
the range (wood or coal burning stove)  on a very low heat. I don't know
how long it took, overnight at least. My (late) father-in-law talked
about seeing it made when he was a boy in Cornwall. Stately home
kitchens in Devon and Cornwall often have pans for making clotted cream
on display.

There is rivalry between Cornwall and Devon as to
which makes the best cream. I don't know if there are actually any
subtle differences in the method, or it is just traditional rivalry. The
local deli sells clotted cream from big (plastic) shallow containers, so you can buy the amount you want. I wish I could bring you some!

Tue 7-Sep-10
3:48 pm
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Michelle from Oregon
Oregon, USA

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Insert big sigh here!

Well, its probably for the best, I allready have a weight problem! big_laugh

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Tue 7-Sep-10
7:40 pm
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maggenpie
Cornwall, UK

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devongarden said:

  


That is fairly close to the original, I think, Michelle. It was made

in very wide shallow pans (think, 18 inches wide, a few inches deep) on

the range (wood or coal burning stove)  on a very low heat. I don't know

how long it took, overnight at least. My (late) father-in-law talked

about seeing it made when he was a boy in Cornwall. Stately home

kitchens in Devon and Cornwall often have pans for making clotted cream

on display.


Hi from Cornwall Devongarden wave Yes thats the way my grandmother made it. My mother still talks about it. 

Suz thats a really useful comparison list, thank you for doing that, I shall print it off. Thanks to google I often cook from American recipes and I'd wondered what half and half was. confused

Never assume anything - except an occasional air of intelligence.

Wed 8-Sep-10
1:53 am
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Suz
Los Angeles, California

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Michelle from Oregon said:

.....in LA that you would have had no problems finding stuff, you would have figured it would be a foodie paradise.....

 


 

It is if you want to eat out! For example, want to go out for African? OK, which type? Let's say Ethiopian......there's at least 6 Ethiopian restautants that I know of and I don't even like it!

However I have found it not so good for people who cook themselves. I have had to hunt out "chef supply" places for ingredients, which do offer a wider range of good quality yummy stuffs but often in catering sizes devil  Oh well, someone has to eat up all that dessert right.....

Thanks for the link on how to make double cream if you live in the USA. Will have to try it out when I have time. By "double boiler" do they mean a roasting pan filled with an inch or two of water and then put a basin in that and put the whole thing in the oven?

Maggenpie, I'm glad the info will be useful to others. Do you favour savoury of dessert recipes?

Also, I thought that clotted cream was so thick you had to use a knife to serve it but Devon cream you could just about pour. Am I wrong? I need a native wink

Life is uncertain ………… eat dessert first!

Wed 8-Sep-10
7:01 am
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JoannaS
Latvia

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your comments reminds me of being in Fort Collins, Colorado the place with the highest number of restaurants per capita outside of New York so I was told roll_eyes

Wed 8-Sep-10
9:10 am
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brightspark
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Suz said:

Thanks for the link on how to make double cream if you live in the USA. Will have to try it out when I have time. By "double boiler" do they mean a roasting pan filled with an inch or two of water and then put a basin in that and put the whole thing in the oven?

 


 Suz, a double-boiler is a stove-top, not an oven, process.

It is a saucepan with water boiling, with another receptacle on top to, say, melt chocolate!

See here for a Wiki description.

brightsparklystuff

Women are like tea bags. . .
you never know how strong they are
until they're in hot water.
- Eleanor Roosevelt -
Wed 8-Sep-10
3:15 pm
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Michelle from Oregon
Oregon, USA

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maggenpie said: 

 

 Thanks to google I often cook from American recipes and I'd wondered what half and half was. confused


 Hi Maggenpie,

If you need advise/interpretation on American recipes, well you found Barbara (Devon Garden) all ready, she's an American ex-pat, Suz lives over here for what is it now, 10 years?

And then there's me, the token American.....big_laugh....happy to help!

If you can't be a shining example, be a terrible warning!

Wed 8-Sep-10
9:23 pm
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KateUK
uk

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I have a wonderful Shaker recipe book, but some of the ingredients are a bit mysterious- now I know who to ask - Michelle!star

Kateuk makes things at http://www.etsy.com/shop/finkstuff and sometimes she does this too http://www54paintings.blogspot.com/ and also this http://finkstuff.weebly.com/

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