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Wild Berries & other exciting stuff!
Sun 25-Jul-10
6:11 pm
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Danny
Scarborough, England
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Wild plums and elderberries. Mmmmmm. Never had elderberry jam or any jam combo with them in it.

It would certaily be an interesting experiment, Shelley.

We hope for a bumper crop of both wild plums and elderberries from the trees in our garden. F did not pluck much elderflower this year. The berries are still very green though.

Never knowingly underfed

Sun 25-Jul-10
6:50 pm
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shelley
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in the end I made the elderberry syrup that TA posted on the site and then a wild plum and almond butter from Marguerite Patten's book.  The plums were exceedingly tart so I had to add more sugar than stated!!

Am going to pick some more plums tomorrow to top up my stock of basic wild plum jam and mirabelle jam.

 

Just had a thought today that I might offer courses in wild harvest here in toulouse (would have to open a second company to be legal as my type only covers sales, not services) could take people berry collecting then cook a basic recipe with them that they could take home; what do you think??

Sun 25-Jul-10
8:25 pm
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devongarden
Devon, UK

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I think that having to set up a separate company to do it is strange--clearly odd Gallic law. eeek

But the idea of wild harvest or foraging courses sounds good, especially making something they could take home with them. Could you stagger the courses to cover gaps between markets, to keep a somewhat even cash flow?

Sun 25-Jul-10
11:18 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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shelley said:

Just had a thought today that I might offer courses in wild harvest here in toulouse (would have to open a second company to be legal as my type only covers sales, not services) could take people berry collecting then cook a basic recipe with them that they could take home; what do you think??


 

 

I think - good idea!  As long as setting up another company will not make it more labour intensive.  It will also get you out into the countryside which will be a wonderful thing to do.  toffeeapple

I'll try that again!

Mon 26-Jul-10
6:44 pm
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shelley
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yep It is wierd but I am pretty certain I would have to set up another company!

 

I love foraging already and am beginning to determine where to find various berries in my local environment.  I feel that I would need to learn more about the wild herbs and greens to really offer a good course and to have a wide selection of products to try out.  The idea of wild harvest is quite popular here in France but has not yet had such a big resurgence as it is seeing in the uk.  I think that it would complement my jams sales well; especially as I am already developing a wild harvest range!

 

Lastly it would indeed give me another income stream and keep me outdoors and active so not stiffening up!

 

Glad you like the idea!  Will keep you informed, though I am not aiming for a quick setup: probably next year in time for spring harvests

Mon 26-Jul-10
9:37 pm
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MOS
Cannock Chase

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Wed 12-May-10
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Hi shelly that idea sounds great ,what a wonderfull way to get out and about with added benefits too boot .i am sad we wont get chance to do some foridging with you this september ,but perhaps we will get to do some soon we could be guinnypigs ,i dont think i have been a guinnypig since the Mrs MOS tryed to make non fruit fruit cake for someone who diddent like raisins or sultanas .AND it worked !!!

i hope you are swatting for your exams in a few weeks .Take a deep breath and show them what you are made off MOS xx

sit down with a cupa and the urge will subside

Mon 26-Jul-10
10:50 pm
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Danny
Scarborough, England
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The great thing about offering a course like that, Shelley, is that you will learn so much about foraging just trying to keep ahead of the class in different seasons. I cannot guess whether it would be a commercial success for you - guess a lot may depend on your marketing and who you target it at (e.g. affluent townies) but you will win out in any case with greater knowledge and expertise at foraging.

Never knowingly underfed

Mon 26-Jul-10
11:36 pm
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danast
Argyll, Scotland

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wave  I think that is a great idea Shelley although my first reaction was I hope you are not trying to do too much.  But you are right it will keep you moving and active.  Also if you are not going to start till next Spring you will have lots of time to do research on your area and find out all the regulations etc.  I am sure you will enjoy, as Danny says, being one step ahead of your clients.  I like the idea of the affluent townies.  

I have just had a fairly serious  discussion tonight on how we live in a very technological  computer almost virtual  age and how many people cannot connect with nature and do not feel comfortable away from technology be it facebook, i pad, i phone or whatever.  This does worry me as the younger generation grow up.  How wonderful to be offering the knowledge that you have, to others, to make them feel more comfortable in their surroundings and to be able to collect food. 

Old teachers never die, they just lose their class

Tue 27-Jul-10
8:08 pm
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shelley
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Thanks for all your comments!

I probably am trying to do a bot much Danuta; but I have always done thus and actually, the more I can keep mobile the better, so despite pain, this should help and I dont really have to walk too far to find stuff here

I thought I would buy the book from the series 'Grow your own Drugs' as it not only gives me plant knowledge but recipes too

Has anyone got any other suggestions for good guides??

Wed 28-Jul-10
11:26 am
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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How about 'Food for Free' by Richard Mabey?  Published in 1972, I think and I believe he has done another since then.  I expect Google will point you in the right direction.

I'll try that again!

Wed 28-Jul-10
1:33 pm
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Danny
Scarborough, England
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Yes indeed, TA, Food for Free is where I would start. Fiona swears by it.

Shelley, also worth checking out her review of the Wild Food Mentor Course. She rates that highly too.

Might be worth doing a search for "foraging" on her blog for one or two worthwhile tips.

Never knowingly underfed

Wed 28-Jul-10
6:31 pm
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Ruthdigs
Devon

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Shereen said:

This thread seems a good place to mention the book I ordered yesterday: "Edible Hedgerow: River Cottage Handbook No.7". I love John when he appears on River Cottage, and thought the pre-order discount was great for a signed book. Now I just need to reassure G that it's about more than mushrooms!


 

Shereen

I've been thinking of getting this - what do you think of it?

 

Also - has anyone heard of Meadow sweet as a wild harvest?  Saw it here - sounds good I thought.

Wed 28-Jul-10
7:26 pm
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JoannaS
Latvia

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Must admit to wondering if I could substitute meadowsweet for elderflowers, I must give it a go as there is plenty of meadowsweet around here. It also makes a nice cuppa.

Since we are on the subject of cuppas, lilac makes a nice tea too and you can dry them. One to remember next year.brightsparklystuff

Wed 28-Jul-10
7:39 pm
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Toffeeapple
North Bucks

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What a pretty plant, I wonder if we have it locally?

I'll try that again!

Wed 28-Jul-10
7:49 pm
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mike.
Coventry

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I got an email this morning from the River Cottage mailing list and one of the things in it was an advert for the Edible Hedgerow handbook. I'm seriously considering buying a copy. I have lots of cookbooks, a couple of gardening book, but nothing about 'wild' plants or foraging. I've been thinking of getting some kind of 'wild plant' guide and this one should be very useful.

Visit my blog for food, drink, photography and hamsters.

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