The Cottage Smallholder


stumbling self sufficiency in a small space

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Tips and tricks - bottling, canning, preserving
Thu 22-Sep-11
10:17 pm
Avatar
Terrier
York

Supreme Being
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 4518
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Have saved it for a browse on a rainy day Maura

Fri 23-Sep-11
1:26 pm
Avatar
devongarden
Devon, UK

Councillor
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 1294
Member Since:
Thu 7-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Michelle was very brave, eating some unprocessed preserves,  big_laugh despite all the US authorities sternly requiring it. 

I have just been looking at various UK sites, and it seems there is a clear divide somehwere in the Atlantic. Delia (here) does not mention it, nor does the Allotment Vegetable Growing site (here) and neither does the W.I. (here for a sample recipe). With the growth of 'Elf and Safety here I would guess they all would if they considered there was any risk. Delia even mentions scraping the top 1/2 inch off the top of mouldy jam and using the rest.

On this one, I will go with the UK and not US authorities!

Fri 23-Sep-11
2:37 pm
Avatar
Hattie
Bucks/Oxon Border

Supreme Being
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 6920
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

In the past I had often wondered if the reason for the extra processing in the USA was because of much higher summer temperatures over there & that these might make the jam ferment & then spoil. But since then I have done a lot of research on recipes & blogs from all over the world (including Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Italy, France, Spain ) none of these countries use (or even mention) the US method.

Has anyone found it cropping up anywhere else?  I am so curious about it & why it came about.  I do know there are still a few families in the US who use the old method, I have seen them post about it & get shouted down by everyone else.

 

"The beautiful is as useful as the useful...perhaps more so."

from Les Miserables

Fri 23-Sep-11
2:59 pm
Avatar
mauramac
Kent

Expert
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 692
Member Since:
Fri 9-Sep-11
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think they call our way of doing it the 'open kettle' method and they are totally paranoid about getting it banned. They cite possible food poisoning and botulism and all sorts of other bacteria.

Here is an extract from one of the US sites about that:

The US Department of Agriculture and many major universities
(Clemson, University of Georgia, University of Illinois, University of
Wisconsin, University of Minnesota, to name a few; click here for links to the
references, at the bottom of this page) l have each extensively studied food
safety and home canning.  To summarize their findings; all of them state that if
you are canning at home, including making jams and jellies, you must use a water
bath or pressure canner, if you want to avoid food poisoning.  By food poisoning
they are referring to varieties of bacteria, such as botulism, that grow in a
sealed environment.  Without hyperbole, death is one of the outcomes of such
poisoning.  See this page for detailed
information about botulism food poisoning.

They really really feel passionate about their canning process eeek

 

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow.

Fri 23-Sep-11
3:22 pm
Avatar
Hattie
Bucks/Oxon Border

Supreme Being
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 6920
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Maura'

There is something wrong with your link as it comes up as an Error404 

 

Error 404

The page you requested is no longer here!

Visit the Home Page

In order to improve our service, can you inform us that someone else has an incorrect link to our site?

Report broken link

 

"The beautiful is as useful as the useful...perhaps more so."

from Les Miserables

Fri 23-Sep-11
3:34 pm
Avatar
mauramac
Kent

Expert
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 692
Member Since:
Fri 9-Sep-11
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Oh right - Sorry, I should have left that bit off the message when I typed it in. The link to the website if you are interested is the one I included on an earlier post but it is here.....

http://www.pickyourown.org/canning_whyuseacanner.htm

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow.

Fri 23-Sep-11
5:25 pm
Avatar
devongarden
Devon, UK

Councillor
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 1294
Member Since:
Thu 7-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think Nadine is right about the higher summer temperatures being part of the reason why it is recommended. I also suspect a political angle--home preserving was done by the rural poor, who couldn't be trusted to do it right and needed to be taught by those in the know who use relatively expensive (think of the extra fuel costs) methods. 

But they seem to link all bacteria with botulism, which is fatal, but never question why other countries don't have a problem with it. doh

Fri 23-Sep-11
5:47 pm
Avatar
Hattie
Bucks/Oxon Border

Supreme Being
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 6920
Member Since:
Mon 21-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Barbara,

I am fascinated by what you say about the political angle & the rural poor. I read many US Forums & belong to some of them & I am constantly amazed by this attitude still having so much control over people's lives. 

It also may be that because the US is such a litigious country people will not even try the old method in case they get sued. I am fascinated that they also water bath chutney which has both vinegar & sugar in it.

 

"The beautiful is as useful as the useful...perhaps more so."

from Les Miserables

Fri 23-Sep-11
6:02 pm
Avatar
devongarden
Devon, UK

Councillor
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 1294
Member Since:
Thu 7-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Nadine, I shake my head about the further processing of chutney and pickles.I am sure that the litigious nature of the country means that no one dares not use old (fashioned) methods.

I wonder if there is also a 'home preserving is old-fashioned, we have more modern ways of doing things' attitude. My grandmother (in the US) made jam and jelly, but I don't know if she used a water bath for things. I probably wasn't allowed in the kitchen when 'dangerous' things were happening. I have a vague memory of bottled tomatoes in the larder, so I suspect she bottled things, but stopped when they got a freezer in the very early 1950s.

Fri 23-Sep-11
6:35 pm
Avatar
mauramac
Kent

Expert
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 692
Member Since:
Fri 9-Sep-11
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

If you take a look on their forums they are obsessed with canning in this way and talk about it endlessly. I know we discuss similar matters but not in the same intense manner. They all seem to try and outdo each other with their methods of sterilising. If one person says they do it one way then immediately 2 or 3 others will say "oh thats not good enough, you also need to do this and that to be absolutley sure".

As sure as eggs are eggs it keeps going until you think blo*dy hell the poor woman was only saying how she does things and suddenly she is made to feel totally inadequate. I thank God I live here in UK and when I ask for help on here everyone is so helpful and not judgemental.

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow.

Sat 24-Sep-11
9:00 am
Avatar
devongarden
Devon, UK

Councillor
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 1294
Member Since:
Thu 7-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I can remember when I was growing up occasionally reading items in the newspaper about people or whole families that died of botulism, usually from home-canned green beans as I remember it. Somehow the powers that be have made the leap from the need to heat process vegetables and fruit to anything that you dare to put into a jar must be heat processed, ignoring the preserving power of vinegar and of sugar.

Sat 24-Sep-11
3:45 pm
Avatar
mauramac
Kent

Expert
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 692
Member Since:
Fri 9-Sep-11
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Really - what here in the UK? I didn't realise that we canned beans or anything much here in the home years ago. I know in the war there was a need to grow and preserve things but I assumed food was in short supply and therefore eaten fairly quickly rather than preserved for long periods. Just goes to show my lack of general knowledge in these things. 

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow.

Sat 24-Sep-11
4:32 pm
Avatar
devongarden
Devon, UK

Councillor
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 1294
Member Since:
Thu 7-Jan-10
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Sorry Maura, I meant in the US! (I am American, but have lived in the UK for a long time now.)

Thu 6-Oct-11
2:24 pm
Avatar
Aly
Normandy France

Supreme Being
Members

New members
Forum Posts: 9516
Member Since:
Sun 2-Oct-11
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I am new to the site but keen to be as self sufficient as possible.

Due to a glut of fruit this year I accidently found a tasty alternative to jam. A batch of blackcurrant failed to set so I bottled it anyway and we are using it for a fruit sauce with yogurt or ice cream. Makes a great version of Eton mess too with meringue and créme fraiche smile

Trying to enjoy life as it is

http://www.letertregites.com

Thu 6-Oct-11
3:49 pm
Avatar
Toffeeapple
North Bucks

Members

Moderators
Forum Posts: 16337
Member Since:
Tue 22-Sep-09
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

wave Hello Aly and welcome to the mad house!  That sounds like a tasty idea, well done.

I'll try that again!

No permission to create posts
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 767

Currently Online:
35 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

brightspark: 10532

danast: 10232

Aly: 9516

Sooliz: 8084

Hattie: 6920

Ambersparkle: 6698

JoannaS: 4800

Terrier: 4518

eileen54: 4424

Xahha: 4231

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 10

Members: 15881

Moderators: 2

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 6

Forums: 25

Topics: 2271

Posts: 123053

Newest Members:

Hukkow, Kyle Edwards, Mrs_ff, Garcerir, Artur77

Moderators: Toffeeapple: 16337, AdminTA: 10

Administrators: fn: 333, Danny: 5516


Copyright © 2006-2012 Cottage Smallholder      Our Privacy Policy      Advertise on Cottage Smallholder