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Easy recipe for Yorkshire puddings – the puffiest in the world

Yorkshire puddings

Wow! Amazing Yorkshire puddings

I’ve always been rather proud of my Yorkshire puddings. But this recipe new puts my usual offerings totally in the shade. These puds puff up, keep their shape and are 100% guaranteed to be a success.

I was given this recipe by a checkout lady at Tesco many months ago. It is such an easy, no fuss recipe that I didn’t even bother to write down the measurements of ingredients. This weekend I decided to finally test it out.

I put the trays into the oven to heat up. It’s well known that the secret of great Yorkshire puds is to have the fat or oil very hot – ideally smoking. Danny was keen for me to put my puds into the oven to fit in with his timings. So feeling a bit under pressure I didn’t give the oil enough time to heat up to smoking point. As I poured in the mixture there was hardly a hiss.
“Oh no,” I shrieked,”I’ll have to make them again tomorrow.”
“That’s fine, Conchita. I’d happily have Yorkshire puds every day.”
But that wasn’t really the point.

Imagine my surprise when I discovered that the puds had risen perfectly. And even better they didn’t droop – they were crisp on the outside and soft and delicate in the middle. If these worked so well without the fat being hot enough what would they be like if the fat was actually smoking? That’s why I can guarantee 100% that these Yorkshire puds will work for you if you follow the recipe below exactly.

I think that the other key trick with Yorkshire puds is to make the batter and let it rest in the fridge for at least and hour before making the puds. Several hours would be fine as long as you remember to whisk the batter just before pouring it into the tray. Incidentally I use old fairy cake tins inherited from my mum. Individual Yorkshire puds seem so much more special that one large one that everyone slices into.

If the temperature that these puds need to cook is higher than your roast, don’t worry. They can be made whilst your joint is resting. A rested roast tastes far better than a joint straight from the oven.

One word of warning: these puds are extremely moreish – I guzzled four and if there had been more going spare they would have snatched by me too. We’ve now made the waist increasing decision to serve Yorkshire puds each Sunday with every kind of roast. Yum.

Yorkshire puds keep well in the fridge for a few days too. Next time I’m going to make lots more for breakfast snacks – perfect with savoury or sweet toppings.

Easy recipe for Yorkshire Puddings

Find a measuring jug or a set of American cups. All the ingredients are equal in volume rather than weight. I used my one third American cup and this made six individual puds. If you are using a measuring jug, 100ml would make about eight puds.

Ingredients:

One third cup/100ml of white plain/all purpose flour
One third cup/100ml of eggs – two of our eggs filled the cup
One third cup/100ml of milk

Olive oil or lard to put in the baking tray

Method:

Add the flour to a bowl and break in the eggs. Whisk the eggs into the flour – a fork would do – until there are no lumps

Add the milk and whisk until there are no lumps. Put the bowl of batter into the fridge for at least an hour before making the puddings

Put a little oil or lard into the sections of baking tray and place on the top shelf of a pre heated oven – 220c/200c fan. When the oil is very hot, whisk the batter once again and pour into the individual sections. Pop in the oven, top shelf, for exactly 20 mins. Do not open the oven door during this time.

Prepare for rapturous applause.

 

 

Easy recipe for Yorkshire puddings – the puffiest in the world
Recipe Type: side dish to serve with roast meat
Author: Fiona Nevile
Prep time: 10 mins
Cook time: 20 mins
Total time: 30 mins
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • Find a measuring jug or a set of American cups. All the ingredients are equal in volume rather than weight. I used my one third American cup and this made six individual puds. If you are using a measuring jug, 100ml would make about eight puds.
  • One third cup/100ml of white plain/all purpose flour
  • One third cup/100ml of eggs – two of our eggs filled the cup
  • One third cup/100ml of milk
  • Olive oil or lard to put in the baking tray
Instructions
  1. Add the flour to a bowl and break in the eggs. Whisk the eggs into the flour – a fork would do – until there are no lumps
  2. Add the milk and whisk until there are no lumps. Put the bowl of batter into the fridge for at least an hour before making the puddings
  3. Put a little oil or lard into the sections of baking tray and place on the top shelf of a pre heated oven – 220c/200c fan. When the oil is very hot, whisk the batter once again and pour into the individual sections. Pop in the oven, top shelf, for exactly 20 mins. Do not open the oven door during this time.
  4. Prepare for rapturous applause.
Notes

This batter could also be used for Toad in the Hole. Our recipe is here http://www.cottagesmallholder.com/delicious-classic-british-food-best-toad-in-the-hole-recipe-5555/


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16 Comments

  1. I just made these tonight for my Christmas dinner. It’s the first time I ever made Yorkshire puds. I followed the directions exactly, and they came out PERFECT.

    Thank you for the excellent recipe!

  2. Tom Balfe

    Hi there.
    I use this recipe all the time. I use three pint glasses side by side. Break the eggs into one, then fill one of the other two to exactly the same level with plain flour and a pinch of salt and the remaining one to the same level as the other two with milk.
    I have found this a brilliantly stable recipe. I have experimented with hot and cold oil, rested and unrested batter, and the results are perfect every time. Maybe one in ten doesn’t look like a perfect picture book pud, but they are grwat to eat.
    One suggestion: i tried with self raising flour and this didn’t work at all, so avoid that one.
    Thanks for a great site.
    I am off out now to get the ingredients for my “last minute Christmas cake.
    Keep up the good work,
    Tom.

    • Tom Balfe

      Correction to my last: one glass of flour, one of eggs and one of milk. Though I think most on here get my meaning:)

  3. Thank you so much for this recipe! I found it today googling for a recipe to make 8 individual Yorkshires and it went really well – could not believe how big and airy they were (even the one which was only the scrapings from the bowl after I inadvertently divided the batter between 7 compartments)! I had thought they might not be as good as they could be as I didn’t read through in advance and didn’t have time to put the batter in the fridge for an hour, so I put it in the freezer for 10 minutes and they turned out amazingly well. This is definitely my new Yorkshire pudding recipe!

  4. I always get a great result with this recipe, thanks!

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