The Cottage Smallholder


stumbling self sufficiency in a small space

Two recipes: Wild Damson Gin and Sloe Gin recipes

Photo of a bowl of wid damsons

Wild damsons are a beautiful rich dark colour


Unlike sloes, wild damsons are hard to find. For every thirty wild plum trees there may be just one wild damson tree. When I spot wild damsons in the hedgerows, they are harvested into a special bag.

These, and the diminutive bullace, are the kings of hedgerow fruit. These tiny fruit make such an irresistible liqueur that overnight guests have actually turned down Danny’s famous cooked breakfast, and gone back to bed to sleep off the excesses of the night before.

Our damson and sloe gin is not the thick ultra sweet variety. We prefer the sugar to enhance rather than shield the flavour. Every three months or so it’s sampled and, if necessary, topped up with sugar. Usually no extra sugar is needed.

We try to keep our damson and sloe gin well away from the drinks tray! Each year we make a lot of fruit gin and vodka (more recipes to follow, in time). Sloe gin is the big craze at the moment around here, as sloes are more plentiful.

Here are our recipes for both. We are also starting experimenting with sloe gin see this post for details

Tips and tricks:

  • Make more than you need the first year, so you can compare different vintages. This liqueur does improve over time.
  • Some people drain the grog through muslin after a couple of months, to clarify the liqueur and bottle. We don’t bother as one old soak tipped that, once the gin is drunk, you can pour medium sherry on the fruit and start all over again! The latter is devilish and drinkable within three months. We have a recipe for this in our wine and gin section.
  • Keep your fruit gin away from the light as this will maintain the colour. Unless it is in a dark green or brown bottle. Wrapping it in brown parcel paper will keep out the light.
  • Make notes on a label of your fruit gin/vodka /sugar ratio and stick it onto the bottle(s) so that you have a record, if you make a particularly good batch. We note our responses as the grog matures. Yucky after sixth months can be to die for in a year (you will probably not remember without notes). Notes seem boring when you are making the grog but they are so worthwhile when you start again the next year. It won’t be long before you will get a feel of what works well for your taste (and the notes will come into their own).
  • Adding almond essence to sloe gin lifts it from good to great. I haven’t tried this with the damson gin but return in a years’ time for our review.
  • Don’t kill the liqueur with too much sugar at the start. Use the amount above to start your sloe or damson gin and then every couple of months take a tiny sip. At this time add more sugar if it is too sharp for your taste.
  • Gin v Vodka? Vodka can be used as the spirit for these recipes. Although I’m a vodka drinker, we tend to stick to a gin base for our fruit liqueurs.
  • A good damson gin can be made from ordinary damsons available in the shops. As they are bigger you would need to put them into a larger Le Parfait jar (I’d use a 2 litre size).
  • People have been picking sloes from September 1st around here. Some people say that you shouldn’t pick sloes until after the first frost. This can be circumvented by putting your sloes in the freezer overnight. We don’t bother with either method and always have great results.
  • This year we have made up a number of small (1lb honey jars) of sloe gin to give as Christmas presents.

 

Wild Damson Gin and sloe gin Recipes
Recipe Type: Liqueurs
Prep time: 15 mins
Total time: 15 mins
Ingredients
  • Wild damson gin:
  • 1lb/454gm of washed wild damsons
  • 6 ozs/168gm of white granulated sugar
  • 75cl bottle of medium quality gin
  • Sterilised 1 litre (at least) Le Parfait jar or wide necked bottle with stopper/cork
  • Sloe Gin:
  • 1lb/454gm of washed sloes
  • 4 ozs/112gm of white granulated sugar
  • 75cl bottle of medium quality gin
  • Sterilised 1 litre (at least) Le Parfait jar or wide necked bottle
  • 1-2 drops of almond essence
Instructions
  1. Wild damson gin:
  2. Wash damsons well and discard any bad or bruised fruit. Prick fruit several times with a fork and place damsons in either a large
  3. Kilner/Le Parfait jar or a wide necked 1 litre bottle.
  4. Using a funnel, add the sugar and top up with gin to the rim.
  5. Shake every day until the sugar is dissolved and then store in a cool, dark place until you can resist it no longer (leave for at least three months, we usually let it mature for a year). If you are planning to drink this after 3 months, have a nip afetr a month, and top up with sugar to taste.
  6. Some people strain the grog (through muslin/jelly bag) after 3 months and bottle it, leaving it mature for six months. We strain and bottle after a year. Don’t leave the straining process any longer than a year; leaving the fruit in too long can spoil the liqueur, as we found to our cost one year.
  7. Sloe gin:
  8. Wash sloes well and discard any bruised or rotten fruit. Prick fruit several times with a fork and place sloes in either a large Kilner/Le Parfait jar or a wide necked 1 litre bottle. I put several sloes in my palm to prick them rather than picking them up one by one.
  9. Using a funnel, add the sugar and top up with gin to the rim. Always open sugar bags over the sink as sugar tends to get caught in the folds at the top of the bag.
  10. Add the almond essence.
  11. Shake every day until the sugar is dissolved and then store in a cool, dark place until you can resist it no longer (leave for at least three months, we usually let it mature for a year).
  12. Some people strain the grog (through muslin/jelly bag) after 3 months and bottle it, leaving it mature for six months. We strain and bottle after a year.

  Leave a reply

682 Comments

  1. Maysiegirl

    Hi all, I live in Suffolk and this year there are virtually no sloes to be seen. I wondered if anyone had reused the sloes from last years gin to make a second batch? Would it work? Christmas without sloe gin is just not right!
    Thanks for any help,

  2. I make sloe gin and damson vodka/gin every year… I don’t add sugar at all until I’m ready to bottle… I leave the fruit for about 6 months and then strain. I use sugar syrup and add carefully, to taste so that I get the exact sweetness that I want. After bottling it will keep for as long as you want… I make jam with the used fruit.

  3. Bridget Kelly

    Hi there….Has anyone tried plum gin, I wondered if this works also being similar to a damson?

    • Yes. In Romania they use all kinds of soft fruit… Strawberries/ raspberries/ apricots/peaches/plums/blackberries/black currents… 1lb of fruit to 1 bottle vodka or gin, leave for 6 months, strain and add sugar syrup to taste, then bottle… I forget what the Romanian is but it translates as ‘ladies drink’ regardless of the fruit.. Traditionally used as a warming drink for winter evenings…xx

  4. Brian Thornton

    Hi Mike,
    We only ever put around half the recipe amount of sugar in until we taste the result, then add more until it tastes right!

  5. In the recipe for damson gin, it says 6oz/168gm of sugar. My maths says 6oz = 227g not 168g

  6. Gary Doig

    We made gooseberry Gin for our wedding and got a second batch that was also excellent. Can you do the same with damsons – I am 6 weeks into our first damson Gin making experience.

  7. I have boiled the damson and take out the nut but what do I do mow. I have never even seen them before let alone used them ,?

    • You have done the hard bit! You can push through a sieve, add sugar or honey to taste and swirl into yoghurt, but I usually make jam. There are literally hundreds of recipes for this on the internet. Good luck!

  8. If looking for wild damsons, they are usually planted as wind breaks in the country in hedgerows.
    Sloes or Blackthorns are more hedgerow plants originally planted as cattle proof hedges due to their sharp thorns.They have beautiful white blossom in Spring.
    Occasionally greengage or yellowgage plum trees are also used as wind breaks in hedgerows.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

HTML tags are not allowed.

2,148,453 Spambots Blocked by Simple Comments


Copyright © 2006-2012 Cottage Smallholder      Our Privacy Policy      Advertise on Cottage Smallholder


HG